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Wilton, New Hampshire

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Wilton is a town in Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, United States The population was 3,677 at the 2010 census1 Like many small New England towns it grew up around water-powered textile mills, but is now a rural bedroom community with some manufacturing and service employment Wilton is home to the High Mowing School, a private preparatory school

The compact town center, where 1,163 people resided at the 2010 census,2 is defined by the US Census Bureau as the Wilton census-designated place and is located near the junction of New Hampshire Routes 31 and 101, at the confluence of Stony Brook with the Souhegan River

Contents

  • 1 History
  • 2 Geography
    • 21 Adjacent municipalities
  • 3 Demographics
    • 31 Town center
  • 4 Sites of interest
  • 5 Notable people
  • 6 References
  • 7 External links

Historyedit

The town was first part of a township chartered as "Salem-Canada" in 1735 by Colonial Governor Jonathan Belcher of Massachusetts, which then claimed this area It was granted to soldiers from Salem, Massachusetts, who had served in 1690 under Sir William Phips in the war against Canada "Salem-Canada" was one of the towns on the state's borders intended to provide protection against Indian attack3

It would be regranted in 1749 by New Hampshire colonial Governor Benning Wentworth as "Number Two", before being incorporated in 1762 as "Wilton"4 It was either named for Wilton, England, or for Sir Joseph Wilton, a famous English sculptor Sir Wilton's coach design for King George III's coronation was later used as a model for the Concord coach The town of Wilton, Maine, would later be named for Wilton, New Hampshire5

The Souhegan River originally provided water power for mills Today, Wilton is a rural town with orchards, farms and woodlands

Geographyedit

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 258 square miles 669 km2, of which 258 square miles 667 km2 is land and 008 square miles 02 km2, or 037%, is water1 Wilton is drained by the Souhegan River, and Stony and Blood brooks The town's highest point is 1,140 feet 350 m above sea level, where the east slope of Fisk Hill touches the town's western border

The town center, defined as a census-designated place, has a total area of 19 square miles 50 km22

Adjacent municipalitiesedit

  • Lyndeborough, New Hampshire north
  • Milford, New Hampshire east
  • Mason, New Hampshire south
  • Greenville, New Hampshire southwest
  • Temple, New Hampshire west

Demographicsedit

Census
Historical population
Pop
1790 1,105
1800 1,010 −86%
1810 1,017 07%
1820 1,070 52%
1830 1,041 −27%
1840 1,033 −08%
1850 1,161 124%
1860 1,369 179%
1870 1,974 442%
1880 1,747 −115%
1890 1,850 59%
1900 1,696 −83%
1910 1,490 −121%
1920 1,546 38%
1930 1,724 115%
1940 1,855 76%
1950 1,952 52%
1960 2,025 37%
1970 2,276 124%
1980 2,669 173%
1990 3,122 170%
2000 3,743 199%
2010 3,677 −18%
Est 2015 3,690 04%
US Decennial Census7

As of the census8 of 2000, there were 3,743 people, 1,410 households, and 1,023 families living in the town The population density was 1453 people per square mile 561/km² There were 1,451 housing units at an average density of 563 per square mile 217/km² The racial makeup of the town was 9757% White, 035% Black or African American, 013% Native American, 051% Asian, 045% from other races, and 099% from two or more races Hispanic or Latino of any race were 077% of the population

There were 1,410 households out of which 367% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 596% were married couples living together, 89% had a female householder with no husband present, and 274% were non-families 197% of all households were made up of individuals and 82% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older The average household size was 265 and the average family size was 306

|In the town, the population was spread out with 269% under the age of 18, 63% from 18 to 24, 308% from 25 to 44, 252% from 45 to 64, and 108% who were 65 years of age or older The median age was 37 years For every 100 females there were 947 males For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 959 males

The median income for a household in the town was $54,276, and the median income for a family was $61,311 Males had a median income of $39,830 versus $28,714 for females The per capita income for the town was $26,618 About 31% of families and 42% of the population were below the poverty line, including 38% of those under age 18 and 92% of those age 65 or over

Town centeredit

As of the census8 of 2000, there were 1,236 people, 503 households, and 320 families residing in the CDP, the main village settlement of the town The population density was 6374 people per square mile 2460/km² There were 520 housing units at an average density of 2681 per square mile 1035/km² The racial makeup of the CDP was 9782% White, 008% Black or African American, 008% Native American, 065% Asian, 032% from other races, and 105% from two or more races Hispanic or Latino of any race were 097% of the population

There were 503 households out of which 312% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 475% were married couples living together, 105% had a female householder with no husband present, and 362% were non-families 262% of all households were made up of individuals and 119% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older The average household size was 246 and the average family size was 296

In the CDP, the population was spread out with 248% under the age of 18, 86% from 18 to 24, 333% from 25 to 44, 210% from 45 to 64, and 123% who were 65 years of age or older The median age was 36 years For every 100 females there were 922 males For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 908 males

The median income for a household in the CDP was $39,345, and the median income for a family was $47,330 Males had a median income of $38,661 versus $23,281 for females The per capita income for the CDP was $21,349 About 35%of families and 52% of the population were below the poverty line, including none of those under age 18 and 145% of those age 65 or over

Sites of interestedit

  • Wilton is home to part of the Russell-Abbott State Forest, named for two of Wilton's earliest families
  • Andy's Summer Playhouse is a children's theatre that attracts visitors throughout the region
  • Frye's Measure Mill, a historic 150-year-old mill, is three miles west of downtown Wilton, at the junction of Davisville Road and Burton Highway, with tours available
  • The Wilton Town Hall Theatre is a private art-house movie theater which screens films in the Town Hall's auditorium and in a former dressing room for vaudeville troupes which once played the auditorium
  • The Souhegan Mills are an iconic part of the Wilton town center landscape, and have been used alternatively as an apple packing plant, a dressing mill, and an ammunition box factory during World War II Souhegan Mills is currently the home of Souhegan Wood Products, a manufacturer and distributor of a variety of recycled wood products

Notable peopleedit

Wilton c 1870-1880
  • Charles Greeley Abbot, astrophysicist
  • John Putnam Batchelder, physician
  • Charles A Burns, businessman and politician
  • Frank Gay Clarke, congressman
  • Rod Price, guitarist
  • Annie R Smith, hymnist
  • Uriah Smith, author, editor and church leader
  • William French Smith, US attorney general

Referencesedit

  1. ^ a b "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data G001: Wilton town, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire" US Census Bureau, American Factfinder Retrieved February 13, 2014 
  2. ^ a b "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data G001: Wilton CDP, New Hampshire" US Census Bureau, American Factfinder Retrieved February 13, 2014 
  3. ^ Coolidge, Austin J; John B Mansfield 1859 A History and Description of New England Boston, Massachusetts p 698 
  4. ^ New Hampshire Economic and Labor Market Information Bureau Profile
  5. ^ Maine League of Historical Societies and Museums 1970 Doris A Isaacson, ed Maine: A Guide 'Down East' Rockland, Me: Courier-Gazette, Inc pp 284–285 
  6. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015" Retrieved July 2, 2016 
  7. ^ "Census of Population and Housing" Censusgov Retrieved June 4, 2016 
  8. ^ a b "American FactFinder" United States Census Bureau Retrieved 2008-01-31 

External linksedit

  • Town of Wilton official website
  • Wilton Public & Gregg Free Library
  • High Mowing School
  • New Hampshire Economic and Labor Market Information Bureau Profile
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