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Tuscarawas County, Ohio

tuscarawas county ohio genealogy society, tuscarawas county ohio auditor property search
Tuscarawas County /ˌtʌskəˈrɑːwəs/ TUS-kə-RAH-wəs is a county located in the eastern part of the US state of Ohio As of the 2010 census, the population was 92,5823 Its county seat is New Philadelphia4 Its name is a Delaware Indian word variously translated as "old town" or "open mouth"25

Tuscarawas County comprises the New Philadelphia–Dover, OH Micropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the Cleveland–Akron–Canton, OH Combined Statistical Area

Contents

  • 1 History
  • 2 Geography
    • 21 Adjacent counties
  • 3 Demographics
    • 31 2000 census
    • 32 2010 census
  • 4 Politics
  • 5 Communities
    • 51 Cities
    • 52 Villages
    • 53 Townships
    • 54 Census-designated places
    • 55 Other unincorporated communities
  • 6 Notable people
  • 7 See also
  • 8 References
  • 9 Further reading
  • 10 External links

Historyedit

For years, European-American colonists on the East Coast did not know much about the territory west of the Appalachian Mountains except for reports from a few explorers and fur traders who ventured into the area In 1750, Christopher Gist of the Ohio Land Company explored the Tuscarawas Valley His report of the area hinted at some natural riches and friendly American Indians

In 1761 Moravian missionaries set out from Bethlehem, Pennsylvania to set up a mission in the Tuscarawas Valley Christian Frederick Post, David Zeisberger, and John Heckewelder met with Chief Netawatwees of the western Delaware Indians, also known as the "Lenape" He invited them to the tribal village he had founded, Gekelemukpechunk present-day Newcomerstown, Ohio He granted the missionaries permission to build a cabin near the junction of the Sandy Creek and Tuscarawas River, in present-day Stark County and begin Christianizing the natives While they were successful in baptizing dozens of converts, they were forced to abandon the mission in 1763 during the French and Indian War part of the Seven Years' War

Again, at the request of Chief Netawatwees in 1771, David Zeisberger returned to found additional missions in the Tuscarawas Valley In the spring of 1772, near the present site of New Philadelphia, Ohio, Zeisberger, along with five converted Indian families established the mission of Schoenbrunn beautiful spring They built a school house and a chapel In August of that year, John Heckawelder brought an additional 250 converted Delaware Christians into the village

In late summer 1772, they established a second settlement, roughly 10 miles away from Schoenbrunn, called Gnadenhütten cabins of grace On October 17, 1772, Zeisberger conducted the first religious service at Gnadenhutten In 1776, Chief Netawatwes donated land for another settlement, Lichtenau meadow of light, near present-day Coshocton, then the principal Delaware village in the region6

The American Revolutionary War brought the demise of these first settlements The Delawares, who at the time populated much of eastern Ohio, were divided over their loyalties, with many in the west allied with the British out of Fort Detroit and many in the east allied with the Americans out of Fort Pitt Delawares were involved in skirmishes against both sides, but by 1781 the American sense was that the Delawares were allying with the British In response, Colonel Daniel Brodhead of the American forces led an expedition out of Fort Pitt and on 19 April 1781 destroyed the settlement of Coshocton Surviving residents fled to the north Colonel Brodhead's forces left the Delawares at the other Moravian mission villages unmolested, but the actions set the stage for raised tensions in the area

In September 1781, British forces and Indian allies, primarily Wyandot and Delaware, forced the Christian Indians and missionaries from the remaining Moravian villages The Indian allies took their prisoners further west toward Lake Erie to a new village, called Captive Town, on the Sandusky River The British took the missionaries David Zeisberger and John Heckewelder under guard back to Fort Detroit, where the two men were tried but eventually acquitted on charges of treason against the British Crown

The Indians at Captive Town were going hungry because of insufficient rations, and in February 1782, more than 100 returned to their old Moravian villages to harvest the crops and collect the stored food they had been forced to leave behind In early March 1782, 160 Pennsylvania militia led by Lieutenant Colonel David Williamson raided the villages and garrisoned the Indians in the village of Gnadenhütten, accusing them of taking part in raids into Pennsylvania Although the Delawares denied the charges, the militia held a council and voted to kill them The next morning on 8 March, the militia tied up the Indians, stunned them with mallet blows to the head, and killed them with fatal scalping cuts In all, the militia murdered and scalped 28 men, 29 women, and 39 children They piled the bodies in the mission buildings and burned the village down They also burned the other abandoned Moravian villages in the area

This action, which came to be known as the Gnadenhutten massacre, caused an outright frontier war to break out between the Delawares and the Americans After several years of ongoing campaigns by the natives to terrorize and keep out further American settlers, a brutal campaign by US General "Mad Anthony" Wayne from Fort Washington now Cincinnati was carried out in late 1793, eventually resulting in the Treaty of Greenville being signed in 1795 between the US government and the local natives The Treaty ceded the eastern ⅔ of current-day Ohio to white settlers and once again opened up the territory for white settlement

In October, 1798, David Zeisberger, the same Moravian missionary who had founded many of the original missions in the 1770s, returned to the Tuscarawas Valley to found a new mission, Goshen, from where he continued his work to Christianize the local natives Over the next several years, farmer settlers from Pennsylvania came trickling into the area, and by 1808, the first permanent settlement, New Philadelphia, was founded near the Goshen mission After the War of 1812, Goshen declined as a mission until it was disbanded in 18247

Tuscarawas County was formed from Muskingum County on Feb 15, 18088

Geographyedit

According to the US Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 571 square miles 1,480 km2, of which 568 square miles 1,470 km2 is land and 38 square miles 98 km2 071% is water9

Adjacent countiesedit

  • Stark County north
  • Carroll County northeast
  • Harrison County southeast
  • Guernsey County south
  • Coshocton County southwest
  • Holmes County northwest

Demographicsedit

Census
Historical population
Pop
1810 3,045
1820 8,328 1735%
1830 14,298 717%
1840 25,631 793%
1850 31,761 239%
1860 32,463 22%
1870 33,840 42%
1880 40,198 188%
1890 46,618 160%
1900 53,751 153%
1910 57,035 61%
1920 63,578 115%
1930 68,193 73%
1940 68,816 09%
1950 70,320 22%
1960 76,789 92%
1970 77,211 05%
1980 84,614 96%
1990 84,090 −06%
2000 90,914 81%
2010 92,582 18%
Est 2016 92,420 −02%
US Decennial Census11
1790-196012 1900-199013
1990-200014 2010-20143
Age pyramid of Tuscarawas County, based on 2000 census information

In 2010, 947% spoke English, 14% Spanish, 11% German, and 20% another West Germanic language15

2000 censusedit

As of the census16 of 2000, there were 90,914 people, 35,653 households, and 25,313 families residing in the county The population density was 160 people per square mile 62/km² There were 38,113 housing units at an average density of 67 per square mile 26/km² The racial makeup of the county was 9787% White, 073% Black or African American, 017% Native American, 024% Asian, 005% Pacific Islander, 021% from other races, and 073% from two or more races Hispanic or Latino of any race were 071% of the population 953% spoke English, 13% German and 11% Spanish as their first language

There were 35,653 households out of which 3230% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 5810% were married couples living together, 930% had a female householder with no husband present, and 2900% were non-families 2490% of all households were made up of individuals and 1150% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older The average household size was 252 and the average family size was 301

In the county, the age distribution of the population shows 2540% under the age of 18, 800% from 18 to 24, 2810% from 25 to 44, 2360% from 45 to 64, and 1500% who were 65 years of age or older The median age was 38 years For every 100 females there were 9510 males For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 9140 males

The median income for a household in the county was $35,489, and the median income for a family was $41,677 Males had a median income of $31,963 versus $20,549 for females The per capita income for the county was $17,276 About 720% of families and 940% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1220% of those under age 18 and 780% of those age 65 or over

2010 censusedit

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 92,582 people, 36,965 households, and 25,318 families residing in the county17 The population density was 1631 inhabitants per square mile 630/km2 There were 40,206 housing units at an average density of 708 per square mile 273/km218 The racial makeup of the county was 966% white, 08% black or African American, 03% Asian, 03% American Indian, 02% Pacific islander, 07% from other races, and 12% from two or more races Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 19% of the population17 In terms of ancestry, 380% were German, 160% were Irish, 109% were English, 77% were American, and 76% were Italian19

Of the 36,965 households, 306% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 540% were married couples living together, 98% had a female householder with no husband present, 315% were non-families, and 266% of all households were made up of individuals The average household size was 247 and the average family size was 297 The median age was 409 years17

The median income for a household in the county was $42,081 and the median income for a family was $51,330 Males had a median income of $40,490 versus $27,193 for females The per capita income for the county was $20,536 About 92% of families and 128% of the population were below the poverty line, including 177% of those under age 18 and 102% of those age 65 or over20

Politicsedit

As of the 2012 Presidential Election, the county had 59,884 registered voters Voters in Tuscarawas County tend to lean more towards the Republican candidate, as was the case in 2012 Mitt Romney received 22,242 votes, or 5335% of the votes cast, while President Barack Obama received 18,407 votes, or 4415% of the votes cast21

Presidential Elections Results22
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 647% 26,918 293% 12,188 60% 2,500
2012 534% 22,242 442% 18,407 25% 1,044
2008 475% 20,454 499% 21,498 26% 1,105
2004 555% 23,829 439% 18,853 05% 224
2000 527% 19,549 428% 15,879 46% 1,690
1996 385% 13,388 439% 15,244 176% 6,123
1992 357% 13,179 401% 14,787 242% 8,928
1988 543% 17,145 449% 14,185 08% 259
1984 591% 19,366 401% 13,149 07% 239
1980 522% 15,708 403% 12,117 75% 2,261
1976 448% 14,279 530% 16,880 21% 682
1972 591% 18,413 393% 12,255 16% 501
1968 434% 14,102 481% 15,617 84% 2,742
1964 297% 9,962 703% 23,623
1960 562% 20,637 438% 16,083
1956 606% 19,876 394% 12,908
1952 533% 18,620 467% 16,332
1948 443% 11,873 552% 14,799 05% 145
1944 470% 14,357 530% 16,184
1940 436% 14,675 564% 19,004
1936 313% 10,317 667% 21,991 20% 657
1932 414% 12,369 557% 16,648 30% 888
1928 743% 20,494 247% 6,805 10% 269
1924 570% 13,573 234% 5,566 197% 4,686
1920 520% 11,908 444% 10,167 37% 844
1916 390% 5,404 548% 7,608 62% 860
1912 273% 3,417 398% 4,978 328% 4,101
1908 473% 6,717 477% 6,775 50% 713
1904 558% 7,203 386% 4,979 57% 735
1900 472% 6,355 510% 6,867 18% 245
1896 472% 6,235 522% 6,898 07% 92
1892 430% 4,746 517% 5,715 53% 584
1888 452% 4,730 524% 5,484 23% 243
1884 450% 4,394 534% 5,215 17% 165
1880 453% 4,096 536% 4,844 11% 96
1876 440% 3,574 559% 4,545 02% 13
1872 470% 3,178 530% 3,586 00% 3

Communitiesedit

Map of Tuscarawas County, Ohio With Municipal and Township Labels

Citiesedit

  • Dover
  • New Philadelphia county seat
  • Uhrichsville

Villagesedit

  • Baltic
  • Barnhill
  • Bolivar
  • Dennison
  • Gnadenhutten
  • Midvale
  • Mineral City
  • Newcomerstown
  • Parral
  • Port Washington
  • Roswell
  • Stone Creek
  • Strasburg
  • Sugarcreek
  • Tuscarawas
  • Zoar

Townshipsedit

  • Auburn
  • Bucks
  • Clay
  • Dover
  • Fairfield
  • Franklin
  • Goshen
  • Jefferson
  • Lawrence
  • Mill
  • Oxford
  • Perry
  • Rush
  • Salem
  • Sandy
  • Sugar Creek
  • Union
  • Warren
  • Warwick
  • Washington
  • Wayne
  • York

Census-designated placesedit

  • Dundee
  • Sandyville

Other unincorporated communitiesedit

  • Barrs Mills
  • Bernice
  • Blackband
  • Booth
  • Brightwood
  • Bucks
  • Columbia
  • Eastport
  • Fiat
  • Gilmore
  • Glasgow
  • Goshen
  • Hartwood
  • Lock Seventeen
  • Lowden
  • Mount Tabor
  • New Cumberland
  • Newport
  • Peoli
  • Postboy
  • Ragersville
  • Riverside Park
  • Rock
  • Rockford
  • Rush
  • Schoenbrunn
  • Somerdale
  • Stillwater
  • Wainwright
  • West Chester
  • Wilkshire Hills
  • Winfield
  • Winklepleck Grove
  • Wolf
  • Yorktown
  • Zoarville

Notable peopleedit

  • Samuel G Cosgrove, sixth Governor of the state of Washington23
  • William Clarke Quantrill, Confederate guerrilla leader during the American Civil War
  • Cy Young, Major League Baseball Hall of Famer

See alsoedit

  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Tuscarawas County, Ohio

Referencesedit

  1. ^ "Ohio County Profiles: Tuscarawas County" PDF Ohio Department of Development Archived from the original PDF on 2007-06-21 Retrieved 2007-04-28 
  2. ^ a b "The Export of Pennsylvania Placenames, William A Russ, Jr" Retrieved 2007-05-02 
  3. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts" United States Census Bureau Retrieved February 11, 2015 
  4. ^ "Find a County" National Association of Counties Archived from the original on 2011-05-31 Retrieved 2011-06-07 
  5. ^ "Tuscarawas County data" Ohio State University Extension Data Center Retrieved 2007-04-28 dead link
  6. ^ Guide to Tuscarawas County, Federal Writers Project of Ohio Work Projects Administration, FC Harrington, Florence Kerr, Carl Watson, 1939
  7. ^ Ohio Annals, CH Mitchener, 1876
  8. ^ "Historical Collections of Ohio, Henry Howe" 1888 Retrieved 2010-04-27 
  9. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files" United States Census Bureau August 22, 2012 Retrieved February 11, 2015 
  10. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" Retrieved June 9, 2017 
  11. ^ "US Decennial Census" United States Census Bureau Archived from the original on May 12, 2015 Retrieved February 11, 2015 
  12. ^ "Historical Census Browser" University of Virginia Library Retrieved February 11, 2015 
  13. ^ Forstall, Richard L, ed March 27, 1995 "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990" United States Census Bureau Retrieved February 11, 2015 
  14. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4 Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" PDF United States Census Bureau April 2, 2001 Retrieved February 11, 2015 
  15. ^ "Archived copy" Archived from the original on 2013-08-15 Retrieved 2013-08-07 
  16. ^ "American FactFinder" United States Census Bureau Archived from the original on 2013-09-11 Retrieved 2008-01-31 
  17. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data" United States Census Bureau Retrieved 2015-12-27 
  18. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County" United States Census Bureau Retrieved 2015-12-27 
  19. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates" United States Census Bureau Retrieved 2015-12-27 
  20. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates" United States Census Bureau Retrieved 2015-12-27 
  21. ^ http://boecotuscarawasohus/pastresults/general/2012GeneralSummarypdf
  22. ^ http://uselectionatlasorg/RESULTS
  23. ^ "Washington Governor Samuel G Cosgrove" National Governors Association Retrieved October 10, 2012 

Further readingedit

  • JW Cummins and Earl E Sanderson, The Water Resources of Tuscarawas County, Ohio Columbus, OH: Ohio Water Resources Board, 1947
  • C Edward DeGraw, The Only Game in Town: A History of Baseball in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, 1867-1955 Tuscarawas County Historical Society, c 1998
  • Federal Writers Project, Guide to Tuscarawas County New Philadelphia, OH: Tucker Printing Co, 1939
  • Henry Howe, History of Tuscarawas County, Ohio, 1808-1889 Knightstown, IN: Bookmark, 1977
  • Herbert P Lohrman and Ralph H Romig, Valley of the Tuscarawas: A History of Tuscarawas County Dover, OH: Ohio Hills Publishers, 1972
  • JB Mansfield, The History of Tuscarawas County, Ohio: Containing a History of the County; Its Townships, Towns, Churches, Schools, etc; General and Local Statistics; Military Record; Portraits of Early Settlers and Prominent Men; History of the Northwest Territory; History of Ohio; Miscellaneous Matters, etc, etc Chicago: Warner, Beers & Co, 1884
  • Fred Miller, Tuscarawas County, Ohio Charleston, SC: Arcadia, 2000
  • Lloyd E Mizer, History of the Schools in Tuscarawas County, Ohio nc: Ohio Retired Teachers Association Tuscarawas County Chapter, 1993
  • Ohio Retired Teachers Association, Tuscarawas County Chapter, History of Early Tuscarawas County Schools New Philadelphia, OH: Printing Dept, Buckeye Joint Vocational School, 1978
  • Earl P Olmstead, A Documentary History of the Ohio & Erie Canal, Tuscarawas County, Ohio New Philadelphia, OH: Tuscarawas County Historical Society and the Tusc-Kent Archives, Kent State University, 1996
  • Edwin S Rhodes, The Centennial History and Atlas of Tuscarawas County, Ohio, 1908 New Philadelphia, OH: Tuscarawas Centennial Association, 1908
  • Julius Miller Richardson, A Brief History of Tuscarawas County, Ohio nc: np, nd 1990s
  • Tuscarawas County Genealogical Society, Tuscarawas County, Ohio Cemeteries New Philadelphia, OH: Tuscarawas County Genealogical Society, 1981

External linksedit

  • Tuscarawas County Government's website
  • Tuscarawas County Convention & Visitors Bureau's website
  • Kent State University The Olmstead Collection, Tuscarawas County Historical Society
  • Ohio and Erie Canal National Heritage Corridor, a National Park Service Discover Our Shared Heritage Travel Itinerary
‹ The template below Geographic location is being considered for deletion See templates for discussion to help reach a consensus ›

Coordinates: 40°27′N 81°28′W / 4045°N 8147°W / 4045; -8147

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