Stawiski


Stawiski is a town in north-eastern Poland, situated within Kolno County, in Podlaskie Voivodeship, approximately 16 kilometres 10 miles east of Kolno and 74 kilometres 46 miles west of the regional capital Białystok Stawiski is the administrative seat of Gmina Stawiski From 1946 to 1975 it belonged administratively to Białystok Voivodeship, and from 1975 to 1998 to Łomża Voivodeship The town is situated on the Dzierzbia River

According to Central Statistical Office Poland, the population of Stawiski as of 31 December 2008 was 2,417 persons

Contents

  • 1 History
    • 11 Jewish community
  • 2 Economy
  • 3 Notable residents
  • 4 References

History

Stawiski was established in 1407–1411 It received city rights around 1688 The Franciscan Order built a monastery there in 1791 The monks were expelled from Stawiski in 1867 during the Partitions, as punishment for supporting the Polish January Uprising against the Russian imperial rule The town was destroyed by fire in 1812 in the course of the French campaign against Russia, and rebuilt again, to become trades and commercial centre known for its furs, fabrics and hats in Congress Poland Stawiski was burned to the ground once more during the Russian–Prussian war of 1915, soon before the re-establishment of the sovereign Republic of Poland The Polish army fought a battle with the Bolsheviks there in July 1920 during the Polish-Soviet War By 1932, over 50% of the local population was Jewish, numbering approximately 2,000

Jewish community

During the Invasion of Poland in 1939, Stawiski was initially occupied by the Germans for one month The Germans sent the Jewish men of the town to a camp in East Prussia, with their shops looted by Germans and Poles The Jewish men returned when the town was handed over to the Soviets The Germans returned to the town during Operation Barbarossa in June 1941, and in early July 1941 instigated a pogrom in which Polish locals wielding iron bars murdered some 300 Jews One the 15th of August the German Gestapo murdered most of Jewish inhabitants, the young and the old in the Kisielnica forest and the able bodied near Mątwica Some 60 Jews remained, mainly skilled workers and their families, who were confined to a ghetto in the town On 2 November 1942, the ghetto was closed and its occupants were transferred to Łomża Ghetto, and from there sent to Auschwitz extermination camp and Treblinka extermination camp Only a few of the town's Jewish inhabitants survived the Holocaust According to the Institute of National Remembrance, Stawiski was one of 23 towns in Eastern Poland in which a pogrom was carried out against the Jews following the German invasion in 1941

A memorial stone near the town marks the murder of the Jews of the town

Economy

The main branch of local economy is agriculture, based on individual arable farms producing crops for local processing as well as raising farm animals for the market Apart from farming, trade and service industries cover the needs of the inhabitants The overall number of people employed in the gmina's economy is 3,545 The breakdown of main employment sectors is as follows Farming and forestry: 2,304 Industry: 177 Trade and services: 727 Education, health services: 288 Administration and policing: 35

The town's revenue in 2003 including its surroundings amounted 4299 mln zloty Net income was 900,000 zloty However, expenses of the commune exceeded its profits in that period, and amounted to 4679 mln zloty Gross revenue and net profits fluctuate depending on expenditures in the public sector, such as environmental protection, water management, dump disposal, sewers, etc

Notable residents

Stawiski is the hometown of the famous chess player Akiba Rubinstein In the main square, there is a monument to Stanisław Steczkowski Zagończyk, who, together with his four brothers, fought in the underground Polish Home Army in 1942–1945

References

  1. ^ GUS 2009-06-02, Ludność Stan i struktura w przekroju terytorialnym Stan w dniu 31 grudnia 2008 r PDF   in Polish
  2. ^ a b c d Oficjalna strona miasta Stawiski in Polish
  3. ^ "Historia i dzieje Stawisk," 2003, Urząd Miejski w Stawiskach in Polish
  4. ^ The Encyclopedia of Jewish Life Before and During the Holocaust: Seredina-Buda-Z, Shmuel Spector, Geoffrey Wigoder, page 1240
  5. ^ Stawiski in Yad VaShem Ghetto Encyclopedia, Yad Vashem
  6. ^ History vs Apologetics: The Holocaust, the Third Reich, and the Catholic Church, David Cymet, page 219
  7. ^ Stawiski Travel Guide Memorial to the 700 murdered by Nazis July 1941 with photograph
  8. ^ WORK WITH OUR POLISH FRIENDS – WHILE CONFRONTING OUR POLISH ENEMIES, JPost, Gil Troy, 6 Feb 2018

Media related to Stawiski at Wikimedia Commons

Coordinates: 53°23′N 22°10′E / 53383°N 22167°E / 53383; 22167



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