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Republican marches

republican marches, united states republican marches
The Republican marches French: marches républicaines were a series of rallies that took place in cities across France on 10–11 January 2015 to honour the victims of the Charlie Hebdo shooting, the Montrouge shooting, and the Porte de Vincennes siege, and also to voice support for freedom of speech2

French government officials estimated that the rallies were attended by up to 37 million people nationwide, making them the largest public rallies in France since 1944, when Paris was liberated from the Nazis at the end of World War II, and also the biggest in French history34

In Paris, due to the expected number of people, three streets were planned for the march from Place de la République to Place de la Nation It was estimated that between 15 and 2 million people marched down and nearby Boulevard Voltaire in Paris56 The Paris marches were attended by 40 world leaders, from both Europe and around the world The presence during the marches of foreign leaders who are accused of not respecting freedom of speech in their own country has been criticized7

In other cities in France, more than 300,000 rallied in Lyon, about a quarter of the population More than 100,000 marched the streets of Rennes, Toulouse, Bordeaux, Grenoble, Montpellier and Marseille within two days Major rallies took place in Montreal, Brussels, Berlin, Amsterdam and Vienna4

In an interview prior to the Republican Marches, Luz, one of the survivors of the attack, described the show of support for the magazine as "wonderful", but bemoaned a lack of diversity of views in the public discourse following the attacks, which he said served the purposes of politicians, as well the use of symbols, which he characterised as contrary to the values of the magazine He noted that, following the attacks, The Marseillaise had been sung in public, which his dead colleagues would have scorned8 Also speaking prior to the Marches, Willem, another surviving cartoonist, said that a demonstration in support of free expression would be "naturally a good thing", but rejected the support of far-right figures such as Geert Wilders and Marine Le Pen: "We vomit on those who suddenly declare that they are our friends"9

Contents

  • 1 Main places
    • 11 January 10
      • 111 France
      • 112 International
    • 12 January 11
      • 121 France
      • 122 International
  • 2 Notable participants
    • 21 France
    • 22 International
    • 23 Did not attend
  • 3 National Front controversy
  • 4 References
  • 5 External links

Main placesedit

January 10edit

Franceedit

  • Toulouse: 150,000 – 180,00010
  • Nantes: 75,000
  • Marseille: 45,000
  • Strasbourg: 45,000
  • Lille: 35,000–40,000
  • Besançon: 30,000
  • Nice: 30,000
  • Limoges: 30,000
  • Pau: 30,000
  • Orléans: 22,000
  • Agen: 13,000
  • Le Havre: 10,000

Internationaledit

  • Brussels: 3,000
  • Amsterdam: 18,000 8 January
  • New York City: 2,000
  • San Francisco: 500
  • Boston: 1,000

January 11edit

Franceedit

  • Paris: 1,500,000–2,000,000
  • Lyon: 330,000
  • Bordeaux: 140,000
  • Rennes: 115,000
  • Grenoble: 110,00011
  • Montpellier: 100,00012
  • Saint-Étienne: 70,000
  • Marseille: 65,000
  • Brest: 65,000
  • Nancy: 50,000
  • Strasbourg: 45,000
  • Toulon: 45,000
  • Angers: 45,000
  • Metz: 45,00013
  • Aix-en-Provence: 40,000
  • Perpignan: 40,000
  • Tours: 35,000
  • Dijon: 35,000
  • Caen: 33,000
  • Clermont-Ferrand: 30,000
  • Lorient: 30,000
  • Nimes: 30,00014
  • Saint-Brieuc: 30,000
  • Reims: 25,000
  • Cherbourg: 25,000
  • Mulhouse: 25,000
  • Quimper: 25,000
  • Angouleme: 20,000
  • Chambery: 20,000
  • Avignon: 20,00015
  • Vannes: 20,000
  • Albi: 16,000
  • Alençon: 15,000
  • Bastia: 15,000
  • Bourg en Bresse: 15,000
  • Blois: 15,000
  • Carcassonne: 15,000
  • La Rochelle: 15,000
  • Laval: 15,000
  • Mâcon: 15,000
  • Perigueux: 15,000
  • Poitiers: 15,000
  • Saint-Malo: 15,000
  • Tarbes: 14,000
  • Belfort: 13,00016
  • Cognac: 11,000
  • Charleville-Mézières: 12,000
  • Troyes: 12,000
  • Ajaccio: 10,000
  • Cannes: 10,000
  • Bergerac: 10,000
  • Tulle: 10,000
  • Colmar: 10,0001718
  • Ferney Voltaire: 10,000
  • Libourne: 10,000
  • Dammartin-en-Goële: 10,000
  • Narbonne: 10,000

Internationaledit

  • Buenos Aires: 1,00019
  • Sydney: 500–1,000
  • Melbourne:
  • Vienna: 12,000
  • Brussels: 20,000
  • Brasília: 30020
  • Rio de Janeiro: 25021
  • São Paulo: 30022
  • Bujumbura: 300
  • Montreal:
  • Ottawa:
  • Quebec City:
  • Toronto:
  • Vancouver:
  • Larnaca
  • Helsinki
  • Tbilisi23
  • Berlin: 18,000
  • Bonn: 1,50024
  • Düsseldorf
  • Hanover: 300 25
  • Munich: 3,000
  • Athens: 500
  • Thessaloniki: 500
  • Rhodes26
  • Jakarta
  • Tehran
  • Cork
  • Dublin: 4,000
  • Jerusalem: 1000
  • Tel Aviv
  • Bologna
  • Milan
  • Pisa
  • Rome
  • Venice
  • Tokyo
  • Beirut
  • Luxembourg: 2,000
  • Valletta: 6027
  • Guadalajara: 20028
  • Oslo: 500
  • Gaza29
  • Ramallah30
  • Warsaw
  • Lisbon
  • Porto
  • Cluj-Napoca: 50031
  • Moscow
  • Cape Town
  • Seoul
  • Madrid: 500–1,000
  • Gothenburg
  • Stockholm: 3,000
  • Geneva: 500
  • Lausanne: 2,000
  • Taipei
  • Bangkok:500
  • Pattaya:30
  • Tunis
  • Ankara32
  • Istanbul33
  • Izmir34
  • Birmingham
  • Cambridge
  • Cardiff: 1,00035
  • Edinburgh
  • London: 2,000
  • Kharkiv36
  • Kiev37
  • Chicago
  • New York City
  • San Francisco: 2,00038
  • Boston: 500
  • Washington, DC: 3,000
  • Caracas: 200 39
  • Ho Chi Minh City

Notable participantsedit

Franceedit

  • Pierre Arditi actor
  • Martine Aubry Mayor of Lille
  • Jean-Marc Ayrault former Prime Minister
  • Édouard Balladur former Prime Minister
  • Claude Bartolone President of the National Assembly
  • Jean-Michel Baylet leader of the Radical Party of the Left
  • François Bayrou leader of the Democratic Movement
  • Tahar Ben Jelloun Franco-Moroccan writer
  • Laurent Berger secrétaire général du syndicat CFDT
  • Dalil Boubakeur President of the French Council of the Muslim Faith and Rector of the Grand Mosque of Paris
  • Jean-Christophe Cambadélis Leader of the French Socialist Party
  • Sorj Chalandon writer
  • Hassen Chalghoumi Imam of Drancy
  • Emmanuelle Cosse leader of Europe Ecology – The Greens
  • Édith Cresson former Prime Minister
  • Roger Cukierman President of Representative Council of French Jewish Institutions
  • Jean-Louis Debré President of the Constitutional Council of France
  • Pascal Delannoy Bishop of Saint-Denis and representative of the French Council of Bishops
  • Bertrand Delanoë former Mayor of Paris
  • Jean-Paul Delevoye President of the French Economic and Social Council
  • Harlem Désir Secretary of State for European Affairs
  • François de Rugy Co-President of the National Assembly's Ecologist Parliamentary Group
  • Dominique de Villepin former Prime Minister
  • Nicolas Dupont-Aignan leader of Arise the Republic
  • François Fillon former Prime Minister
  • Caroline Fourest writer, political pundit, former Charlie Hebdo correspondent
  • Pierre Gattaz CEO of Radiall, President of Medef
  • Laurent Hénart representing the Radical Party
  • Anne Hidalgo Mayor of Paris
  • François Hollande President of France
  • Jean-Paul Huchon President of the Île-de-France Regional Council
  • Alain Juppé former Prime Minister
  • Lionel Jospin former Prime Minister
  • Patrick Karam President of the Representative Council of French Overseas territories
  • Nathalie Kosciusko-Morizet representing the Union for a Popular Movement
  • Jean-Christophe Lagarde leader of Union of Democrats and Independents
  • Stanislas Lalanne Bishop of Pontoise
  • Jack Lang President of the Arab World Institute and former Education and Culture minister
  • Gérard Larcher President of the French Senate
  • Pierre Lemaitre writer
  • Pierre Lescure President of the Cannes Film Festival
  • Moché Lewin Executive Director of the Conference of European Rabbis
  • Stéphane Lissner Director of the Paris Opera
  • Jean-Claude Mailly Secretary General of Workers' Force
  • Richard Malka lawyer for Charlie Hebdo, comic book writer
  • Jean-Luc Mélenchon leader of the Left Party
  • Joël Mergui président du Consistoire central israélite de France
  • Frédéric Mitterrand former Minister of Culture, writer, journalist
  • Hervé Morin leader of New Centre
  • Mohammed Moussaoui President of French Council of the Muslim Faith
  • Fleur Pellerin Minister of Culture and Communication
  • Patrick Pelloux emergency physician, Charlie Hebdo correspondent
  • Plantu political cartoonist
  • Jean-Pierre Raffarin former Prime Minister
  • Jean-Michel Ribes Director of Théâtre du Rond-Point
  • Michel Rocard former Prime Minister
  • Ségolène Royal Minister of Ecology, Sustainable Development and Energy
  • Éric Ruf Director of Comédie-Française
  • Nicolas Sarkozy former President of France
  • Michel Sapin Minister of Finance
  • Éric-Emmanuel Schmitt writer
  • Christiane Taubira Minister of Justice
  • Jacques Toubon Ombudsman of France
  • Philippe Val journalist, former editor of Charlie Hebdo
  • Manuel Valls Prime Minister

Internationaledit

Europe
  • Edi Rama Prime Minister of Albania40
  • Ditmir Bushati Minister of Foreign Affairs40
  • Edmond Brahimaj World leader of the Bektashi Order40
  • Lucjan Avgustini Bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Sapë
  • Sebastian Kurz Minister of Foreign Affairs of Austria
  • Charles Michel Prime Minister of Belgium
  • Jan Jambon Vice-Prime Minister and Minister Of The Interior
  • Zlatko Lagumdžija Vice Chairman of the Council of Ministers of Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Boyko Borisov Prime Minister of Bulgaria
  • Zoran Milanović Prime Minister of Croatia
  • Bohuslav Sobotka Prime Minister of the Czech Republic41
  • Helle Thorning-Schmidt Prime Minister of Denmark
  • Mette Frederiksen Minister of Justice of Denmark
  • Keit Pentus-Rosimannus Minister of Foreign Affairs of Estonia42
  • Alexander Stubb Prime Minister of Finland43
  • Irakli Garibashvili Prime Minister of Georgia44
  • Angela Merkel Chancellor of Germany
  • Thomas de Maizière Minister of the Interior
  • Frank-Walter Steinmeier Minister of Foreign Affairs
  • Sigmar Gabriel Vice-Chancellor and Minister of the Economy
  • Antonis Samaras Prime Minister of Greece
  • Viktor Orbán Prime Minister of Hungary
  • Ferenc Gyurcsány former Prime Minister of Hungary
  • Enda Kenny Prime Minister of Ireland45
  • Matteo Renzi Prime Minister of Italy
  • Angelino Alfano Minister of the Interior
  • Paolo Gentiloni Minister of Foreign Affairs
  • Romano Prodi former Prime Minister of Italy
  • Mario Monti former Prime Minister of Italy
  • Atifete Jahjaga President of Kosovo
  • Laimdota Straujuma Prime Minister of Latvia
  • Xavier Bettel Prime Minister of Luxembourg
  • Joseph Muscat Prime Minister of Malta
  • Michel Roger Minister of State of Monaco
  • Mark Rutte Prime Minister of the Netherlands
  • Erna Solberg Prime Minister of Norway
  • Børge Brende Minister of Foreign Affairs of Norway
  • Ewa Kopacz Prime Minister of Poland
  • Pedro Passos Coelho Prime Minister of Portugal
  • Klaus Iohannis President of Romania
  • Sergey Lavrov Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation46
  • Ivica Dačić First Deputy Prime Minister of Serbia47
  • Maja Gojković President of the National Assembly of Serbia47
  • Robert Fico Prime Minister of Slovakia
  • Miro Cerar Prime Minister of Slovenia
  • Karl Erjavec Minister of Foreign Affairs48
  • Mariano Rajoy Prime Minister of Spain
  • Stefan Löfven Prime Minister of Sweden
  • Simonetta Sommaruga President of the Swiss Confederation
  • Petro Poroshenko President of Ukraine49
  • David Cameron Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
  • Ed Miliband Leader of the Opposition in the United Kingdom
Americas
  • José Bustani Brazilian Ambassador to France
  • Steven Blaney Minister of Public Security of Canada
  • Jane D Hartley United States Ambassador to France50
  • Victoria Nuland Assistant Secretary of State for European and Eurasian Affairs51
Asia
  • Eduard Nalbandyan Minister of Foreign Affairs of Armenia52
  • Benjamin Netanyahu Prime Minister of Israel
  • Abdullah II of Jordan King of Jordan and his wife, Queen Rania
  • Gebran Bassil Minister of Foreign Affairs of Lebanon
  • Abdullah bin Zayed Al Nahyan Minister of Foreign Affairs of the UAE
  • Mahmoud Abbas President of the State of Palestine
  • Zhai Jun Chinese Ambassador to France53
  • Arun Singh Indian Ambassador to France54
  • Ahmet Davutoglu Prime Minister of Turkey
Africa
  • Ramtane Lamamra Minister of Foreign Affairs of Algeria55
  • Thomas Boni Yayi President of Benin
  • Ali Bongo President of Gabon
  • Ibrahim Boubacar Keïta President of Mali
  • Mahamadou Issoufou President of Niger
  • Mehdi Jomaa Prime Minister of Tunisia
  • Faure Gnassingbé President of Togo56
  • Robert Dussey Minister of Foreign Affairs of Togo
  • Macky Sall President of Senegal
  • Sameh Shoukry Minister of Foreign Affairs of Egypt
Institutions
  • Jens Stoltenberg Secretary General of NATO
  • Staffan de Mistura Special Representative of the Secretary-General
  • Irina Bokova Director-General of UNESCO
  • Thorbjørn Jagland Secretary General of the Council of Europe
  • Donald Tusk President of the European Council
  • Jean-Claude Juncker President of the European Commission
  • Martin Schulz President of the European Parliament
  • Federica Mogherini High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy/Vice President for the European Council
  • Michaëlle Jean Secretary General of la Francophonie
  • Nabil Elaraby Secretary General of the Arab League
  • Guy Ryder Head of the International Labour Organization

Did not attendedit

  • Prime Minister of Iceland Sigmundur Davíð Gunnlaugsson did not attend the march; his office released a statement citing the short notice, travel time and the Prime Minister's schedule, and emphasized that no invitation had been rejected, as none had been sent to him specifically Sigmundur Davíð was the only Western European head of government not to attend the march; instead Iceland was represented by the deputy head of mission at the Icelandic Embassy in Paris, Nína Björk Jónsdóttir Sigmundur Davíð's absence was criticized in Iceland, and his office acknowledged that a high-ranking official should have attended the march5758
  • President of the United States Barack Obama did not attend the Paris march, citing the short notice and the logistics of providing the necessary security5159 The Secret Service said it was not consulted and an agency official acknowledged that the Secret Service had pulled off previous last minute trips51 Earnest said that they "should have sent someone with a higher profile" than United States Ambassador to France Jane Hartley59 United States Attorney General Eric Holder and United States Deputy Secretary of Homeland Security Alejandro Mayorkas were in Paris for a security summit convened after the shootings, but did not attend the Paris rally60 The lack of senior American officials was criticized515960

National Front controversyedit

During the organisation march, a controversy arose when Marine Le Pen was told she was not invited in the marches This is due to the National Front reputation of divisiveness François Lamy, one of the organisers, said it is not where the National Front should be; it is not where a political party which, for years, has divided French citizens because of their origin or their religion should be61 The President closed this political issue declaring that "every citizen can comeit is not controlled"62

Referencesedit

  1. ^ Le Parisien, ed 11 January 2015 "Une marche républicaine historique : plus de 3,7 millions de Français ont défilé" Retrieved 12 January 2015 
  2. ^ "Paris Terror Suspects Killed in Twin French Police Raids" Bloomberg 9 January 2014 Retrieved 11 January 2015 
  3. ^ Hinnant, Lori; Adamson, Thomas 11 January 2015 "Officials: Paris Unity Rally Largest in French History" Associated Press Archived from the original on 11 January 2015 Retrieved 11 January 2015 
  4. ^ a b "Paris attacks: Millions rally for unity in France" BBC News 12 January 2015 Retrieved 12 January 2015 
  5. ^ Faiola, Anthony; Witte, Griff 11 January 2015 "Massive crowds join march for solidarity in Paris" The Washington Post Retrieved 11 January 2015 
  6. ^ "France attacks: Million-strong unity rally in Paris" BBC News 11 January 2015 Retrieved 11 January 2015 
  7. ^ "Marche républicaine : "C'est dur d'être récupéré par des cons"" Le Pointfr 
  8. ^ "Luz : "Tout le monde nous regarde, on est devenu des symboles"" Les Inrockuptibles 10 January 2015 
  9. ^ "'We gaan nog zeker twintig jaar door'" Volkskrant 10 January 2015 
  10. ^ "Marche républicaine à Toulouse : 150 000 personnes ont défilé" LaDepechefr 
  11. ^ "110 000 personnes rassemblées à Grenoble" Le Dauphiné 11 January 2015 
  12. ^ "Montpellier : près de 100 000 personnes pour la marche citoyenne" MidiLibrefr 
  13. ^ Plus de 45 000 personnes à Metz: du jamais vu! sur Le Républicain Lorrain
  14. ^ Marche républicaine à Nîmes : les premières images sue Le Midi Libre
  15. ^ "Avignon : 19 000 personnes à la marche républicaine" MidiLibrefr 
  16. ^ "Je suis Charlie : 13000 personnes dans le rassemblement à Belfort" France Bleu 
  17. ^ "Sorj Chalandon, Grand prix du roman de l'Académie française" Le Point in French 28 October 2011 Retrieved 29 November 2011 
  18. ^ Le Courrier picard "COMPIÈGNE 4000 personnes se rassemblent" Le Courrier picard 
  19. ^ "Unas mil personas se reunieron en la embajada francesa en Buenos Aires" Retrieved 12 January 2015 
  20. ^ "Rio, São Paulo e Brasília também têm passeatas em solidariedade às vítimas de Paris" O Globo in Portuguese Retrieved 12 January 2015 
  21. ^ "Cerca de 250 pessoas participam de ato no Rio em solidariedade às vítimas de ataques em Paris" CBN in Portuguese Retrieved 12 January 2015 
  22. ^ "Rio e São Paulo também têm passeatas em solidariedade às vítimas de Paris" Mídia Max in Portuguese Retrieved 12 January 2015 
  23. ^ "Je Suis Charlie" Civil Georgia 8 January 2015 Retrieved 12 January 2015 
  24. ^ Nicolas Ottersbach "Gedenkzug für Charlie Hebdo in Bonn: Lichterkette wird zu Lichtermeer – GA-Bonn" Retrieved 12 January 2015 
  25. ^ "Auch Hannover ist Charlie" HAZ in German Retrieved 12 January 2015 
  26. ^ "Je suis Charlie , "φώναξε" σιωπηλά η Ρόδος" rodosreportgr in Greek Retrieved 12 January 2015 
  27. ^ Diacono, Tim 11 January 2015 "Justice Minister joins Charlie Hebdo tribute march in Valletta" Malta Today Retrieved 17 January 2015 
  28. ^ "Marchan en Guadalajara por atentado contra 'Charlie Hebdo'" Retrieved 14 January 2015 
  29. ^ "Charlie Hebdo: Jerusalem and Ramallah rally in solidarity" Retrieved 12 January 2015 
  30. ^ "Rallies held from Gaza to Tokyo in solidarity with France" The Times of Israel Retrieved 12 January 2015 
  31. ^ "Sute de clujeni au participat la marșul  Je suis Charlie Manifestări de solidaritate au avut loc și la București GALERIE FOTO" România curată 
  32. ^ "Ankara'da Paris protestosu – TRT Türk Haberler" Retrieved 12 January 2015 
  33. ^ "İstanbul'da gazeteciler Charlie Hebdo için yürüdü" BBC Türkçe Retrieved 12 January 2015 
  34. ^ Özgür Gelecek "İzmir: Je suis Charlie" Retrieved 12 January 2015 
  35. ^ "BBC News – Cardiff Bay vigil after French terror attacks" BBC News 
  36. ^ in Ukrainian Kharkiv staged a march in memory of victims of the terrorist attack in Paris, Ukrayinska Pravda 10 January 2015
    in Russian At the monument to Shevchenko rallied against terrorism in France photos, SQ 10 January 2015
  37. ^ "In biting cold Kyivans honor victims of Charlie Hebdo attack" KyivPost 
  38. ^ Avila Gonzalez, Carlos 12 January 2015 "'Je Suis Charlie' rally at San Francisco City Hall" San Francisco Chronicle Retrieved 12 January 2015 
  39. ^ "El mundo marchó para rechazar ataque a Charlie Hebdo" 
  40. ^ a b c "Paris, Marshimi i Paqes" in Albanian Prime Minister Office of Albania 11 January 2015 Retrieved 12 January 2015 
  41. ^ "Premiér Sobotka a ministr Zaorálek uctili pochodem v Paříži oběti teroristického útoku" Retrieved 12 January 2015 
  42. ^ Randlaid, Sven 2014-01-11 "Eesti välisminister osales Pariisis ühtsusmarsil" Estonian Minister of Foreign Affairs participated in Paris in the march of unity ERR Uudised in Estonian Eesti Rahvusringhääling Retrieved 2014-01-12 
  43. ^ "PM Stubb: "Attending Paris march brave for some heads of state"" Yle 11 January 2015 Retrieved 11 January 2015 
  44. ^ "Georgia’s PM participates in solidarity rally in Paris" Agendage 11 January 2015 Retrieved 12 January 2015 
  45. ^ "Enda Kenny joins Paris unity march" Irish Independent 11 January 2015 Retrieved 11 January 2015 
  46. ^ "France/Marche républicaine: Lavrov accueilli par Hollande" in French Russia: frenchruvrru 2015-01-11 
  47. ^ a b "Gojković and Dačić at the Solidarity March in Paris" Voice of Serbia 
  48. ^ http://svet24si/clanek/novice/slovenija/54b284f1e481e/pred-shodom-proti-terorizmu-v-parizu-tam-ze-cerar-in-erjavec
  49. ^ Poroshenko to attend unity rally in Paris on Sunday, Interfax-Ukraine 10 January 2015
  50. ^ Huge Show of Solidarity in Paris Against Terrorism, The New York Times
  51. ^ a b c d White House: 'We should have sent someone with a higher profile', CNN
  52. ^ "Armenian Foreign Minister takes part in Unity March in Paris" Public Radio of Armenia Retrieved 12 January 2015 
  53. ^ 中国驻法大使翟隽应邀出席巴黎反恐大游行 in Chinese CRI Online 12 January 2015 Retrieved 12 January 2015 
  54. ^ "'Paris is today the capital of the world'" Telegraph India 12 January 2015 
  55. ^ "Algérie Presse Service" Algérie presse service 
  56. ^ "Des journaux à côté de la plaque" République Togolaise 
  57. ^ Robert, Zoë 2015-01-12 "Iceland’s PM Criticized for Not Attending Paris March" Iceland Review Retrieved 2015-01-15 
  58. ^ Eygló Svala Arnarsdóttir 2015-01-14 "Iceland’s PM Regrets Not Attending Paris March" Iceland Review Retrieved 2015-01-15 
  59. ^ a b c White House: We should have sent someone to Paris march, USA Today
  60. ^ a b America's absence at Paris rally a mistake, Chicago Tribune
  61. ^ «Il n’y a pas de place» pour le Front national à la «marche républicaine» «Il n’y a pas de place pour une formation politique qui, depuis des années, divise les Français, stigmatise les concitoyens en fonction de leur origine ou de leur religion, ou ne se situe pas dans une démarche de rassemblement des Français» http://wwwledauphinecom/france-monde/2015/01/08/marine-le-pen-denonce-son-exclusion-de-la-marche-republicaine
  62. ^ "Tous les citoyens peuvent venir , il n'y a pas de contrôles" http://wwwfranceinfofr/actu/faits-divers/article/marche-republicaine-fn-tous-les-citoyens-peuvent-venir-la-manifestation-pour-hollande-628859

External linksedit

  • Media related to January 2015 Marches Républicaines at Wikimedia Commons

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