List of former United States counties


This article provides a list of United States counties which no longer exist They were established by a state, provincial, colonial, or territorial government Most of these counties were created and disbanded in the 19th century; county boundaries have changed little since 1900 in the vast majority of states A county is repeated on the list if its jurisdiction changed from one state/colony/territory to another

This list includes but is not limited to counties that were renamed but retained their territorial integrity, or counties that were transferred wholesale to another state when it was separated from another state Massachusetts counties transferred to Maine; Virginia counties transferred to West Virginia

Contents

  • 1 Alabama
  • 2 Alaska
  • 3 Arizona
  • 4 Arkansas
  • 5 California
  • 6 Colorado
    • 61 Counties formed by New Mexico Territory
    • 62 Counties formed by Utah Territory
    • 63 Counties created by Kansas Territory
    • 64 Note on Nebraska Territory
    • 65 Counties created by the Provisional Territory of Jefferson
    • 66 Counties created by Colorado Territory
    • 67 Counties created by the State of Colorado
  • 7 Connecticut
  • 8 Delaware
  • 9 District of Columbia
  • 10 Florida
  • 11 Georgia
  • 12 Idaho
  • 13 Illinois
    • 131 Revolutionary era
    • 132 Former counties of the Northwest and Indiana territories
    • 133 Counties organized by Illinois Territory
  • 14 Indiana
    • 141 Revolutionary era
    • 142 Former counties of the Northwest and Indiana territories
    • 143 Former districts of the Louisiana Territory
    • 144 Former counties of the State of Indiana
  • 15 Iowa
    • 151 Counties of Iowa created by Michigan Territory
    • 152 Counties of Iowa created by Wisconsin Territory
    • 153 Former counties of the State of Iowa
  • 16 Kansas
    • 161 Counties created by Kansas Territory
    • 162 Counties created by the State of Kansas
  • 17 Kentucky
    • 171 Historic counties created by Virginia
    • 172 Modern counties created by Virginia
    • 173 Former counties created by the Commonwealth of Kentucky
  • 18 Louisiana
    • 181 Former parishes
  • 19 Maine
    • 191 Counties organized by Massachusetts in the future State of Maine
  • 20 Maryland
  • 21 Massachusetts
    • 211 Former counties of the colonial era
    • 212 Counties transferred from other colonies
    • 213 Counties organized by Massachusetts in the future State of Maine
  • 22 Michigan
    • 221 Revolutionary era
    • 222 Former counties of the Northwest, Indiana and Illinois territories
    • 223 Former districts of Michigan Territory
    • 224 Former counties of Michigan Territory
    • 225 Former counties of the State of Michigan
  • 23 Minnesota
  • 24 Mississippi
  • 25 Missouri
  • 26 Montana
  • 27 Nevada
  • 28 New Hampshire
  • 29 New Mexico
  • 30 New York
  • 31 North Carolina
    • 311 Counties formed by the colonial government
    • 312 Counties transferred to Federal jurisdiction, 1790
    • 313 Renamed counties
  • 32 North Dakota
  • 33 Ohio
  • 34 Oklahoma
    • 341 Indian Territory
      • 3411 Chickasaw Nation
      • 3412 Choctaw Nation
    • 342 Oklahoma Territory
  • 35 Oregon
  • 36 Pennsylvania
  • 37 South Carolina
  • 38 South Dakota
  • 39 Tennessee
  • 40 Texas
  • 41 Utah
  • 42 Vermont
  • 43 Virginia
  • 44 West Virginia
  • 45 Wisconsin
    • 451 Revolutionary-era claims of Virginia
    • 452 Counties of Wisconsin created by Michigan Territory
    • 453 Counties of Iowa created by Michigan Territory and transferred to Wisconsin Territory
    • 454 Counties of Iowa created by Wisconsin Territory
  • 46 See also
  • 47 References
  • 48 External links

Alabamaedit

  • Baine County, Alabama 1866–1867, reestablished as Etowah County a year later
  • Baker County, Alabama 1868–1874, renamed Chilton County
  • Benton County, Alabama 1832–1858, named for COL TH Benton, Creek War officer and US Senator, renamed Calhoun County in 1858 for John C Calhoun
  • Cahawba County, Alabama 1818–1820, renamed Bibb County
  • Cotaco County, Alabama 1818–1821, renamed Morgan County
  • Decatur County, Alabama 1821–1825, land redistributed between Madison and Jackson counties
  • Hancock County, Alabama 1850–1858, renamed Winston County
  • Jones County, Alabama Feb–Nov 1867, area was reestablished in Oct 1868 as Sanford County and then renamed Lamar County in 1877
  • Jones County, Alabama Aug–Oct 1868, Covington County was briefly renamed Jones County then changed back
  • Sanford County, Alabama 1868–1877, renamed Lamar County

Alaskaedit

Alaska has never created counties Under Section 9 of the 1912 organic act creating the Territory of Alaska, Alaska was prohibited from establishing counties without explicit approval from the US Congress The framers of the Constitution of Alaska chose to forgo consideration of a county system in favor of a system of boroughs, both organized and unorganized In 1961, the Alaska Legislature formalized the borough structure to encompass multiple, separate organized boroughs and a single unorganized borough Alaska currently has 18 organized boroughs The United States Census Bureau, beginning with the 1970 United States Census, divided the Unorganized Borough into census areas The boundaries of these census areas were largely based upon the early election districts of the state, which in turn were largely based upon the recording districts of the territory Following is a list of former boroughs in Alaska:

  • Chugiak–Eagle River Borough 1974–1975, incorporation invalidated by the Alaska Supreme Court1
  • Greater Anchorage Area Borough 1964–1975, succeeded by Municipality of Anchorage
  • Greater Juneau Borough2 1963–1970, succeeded by City and Borough of Juneau
  • Greater Sitka Borough3 1963–1971, succeeded by City and Borough of Sitka
  • The Haines Borough was incorporated in 1968 as a third-class borough Through consolidation, this municipality was dissolved, along with the City of Haines, in 2002 A home rule borough, also called the Haines Borough, was incorporated in the place of these two municipalities

Arizonaedit

  • Pah-Ute County, Arizona Territory 1865–1871 majority of the county transferred to Nevada in 1866, the remainder transferred to Mohave County

Arkansasedit

  • Clayton County, Arkansas4 1873–1875, renamed Clay County
  • Dorsey County, Arkansas5 1873–1885, renamed Cleveland County
  • Lovely County, Arkansas Territory 1827–1828 most of the county was lost to Oklahoma due to the Cherokee Treaty of 1828, the remainder became Washington County
  • Miller County, Arkansas Territory 1820–1838, became part of Indian Territory and present-day Texas
  • Sarber County, Arkansas6 1871–1875, renamed Logan County

Californiaedit

  • Klamath County – created in 1851 from the northern half of Trinity County, but in 1874 it was divided between Humboldt and Siskiyou counties
  • Pautah County – created by the California legislature in 1852 out of territory the state believed would be ceded to it east of Lake Tahoe, but which was given to Nevada The county was never officially organized
  • Coso County – created in 1864 by the California legislature out of territory of Tulare County on the east slope of the Sierra Nevada but was never officially organized The region was later organized in 1866 as Inyo County with additions from Los Angeles and San Bernardino counties
  • Buena Vista County – created in 1855 by the California legislature out of the southeastern territory of Tulare County on the west of the Sierra Nevada but was never officially organized Some of that region was later organized as Kern County in 1866, with additions from Los Angeles and San Bernardino counties

Coloradoedit

Main article: Historic Colorado counties

Colorado Territory was formed from the lands of four organized territories: Kansas to the southeast, New Mexico to the south, Utah to the west, and Nebraska to the northeast Before Colorado Territory was organized, all of these except Nebraska had declared county boundaries that included part of modern-day Colorado

Counties formed by New Mexico Territoryedit

  • Taos County, New Mexico Territory was originally one of the seven partidos of the Spanish, and later Mexican, province of Nuevo México One of the nine original counties created by the US Territory of New Mexico on January 29, 1852; ceased to have jurisdiction over Colorado in 1861
  • Mora County, New Mexico Territory was split from Taos County and San Miguel County on February 1, 1860, and ceased to have jurisdiction over Colorado in 1861

Counties formed by Utah Territoryedit

On March 3, 1852, the following counties were organized by Utah Territory, with boundaries reaching into what is now western Colorado:

  • Great Salt Lake County
  • Iron County
  • Sanpete County
  • Utah County
  • Washington County

Upon the organization of Colorado Territory in 1861, which became law on February 28, these counties ceased to have jurisdiction in Colorado

Green River County was also created on March 3, 1852, but never organized; it was dissolved in 1857 and recreated in 1859 After losing land to Colorado Territory in 1861 and Wyoming Territory in 1868, Green River County was finally dissolved in 1872

Beaver County was formed on January 5, 1856 from parts of Iron and Millard counties, and like other Utah counties, ceased to have jurisdiction in Colorado

Counties created by Kansas Territoryedit

Kansas Territory's western reaches encompassed the mining centers of Aurora and Pike's Peak Beginning with the massive Arapahoe County, Kansas Territory provided for a number of counties in what would become Colorado, but organized none of them before achieving statehood in 1861

Arapahoe County was proclaimed August 25, 1855 but never organized; it reverted to unorganized territory when Kansas joined the Union on January 29, 1861 On February 7, 1859, several counties were split from Arapahoe County; none of them were organized, and also reverted to unorganized territory when Kansas became a state They were:

  • Broderick County
  • El Paso County
  • Fremont County
  • Montana County
  • Oro County

Peketon County was created on the same day in 1859, but never organized Like Arapahoe and its daughter counties, it reverted to unorganized territory upon Kansas achieving statehood

Note on Nebraska Territoryedit

No counties were organized in Nebraska Territory's portion of the future Colorado Territory

Counties created by the Provisional Territory of Jeffersonedit

On November 28, 1859, the Provisional General Assembly of the extralegal Territory of Jefferson proclaimed the boundaries of 12 counties:

  • Arrappahoe County
  • Cheyenne County
  • El Paso County
  • Fountain County
  • Heele County
  • Jackson County
  • Jefferson County
  • Montana County
  • North County
  • Park County
  • Saratoga County
  • St Vrains County

It was never recognized by Federal authorities, but the provisional government of the Territory of Jefferson held effective control of what became Colorado for a year and a half Although the act establishing the Colorado Territory became law on February 28, 1861, the first Federal governor, William Gilpin, did not arrive in Denver until late May, and the Jefferson government disbanded itself on June 6, 1861 In November 1861, Colorado's territorial legislature would establish counties of its own, with many boundaries following those of the Jefferson counties

Counties created by Colorado Territoryedit

  • Guadalupe County, Colorado Territory November 1–7, 1861, was one of the 17 original counties created by the Territory of Colorado The county was renamed Conejos County after only six days
  • Greenwood County, Colorado Territory February 11, 1870 to February 6, 1874, was created from former Cheyenne and Arapaho tribal land and the eastern portion of Huerfano County The county was abolished four years later, and its territory split between Elbert County and Bent County
  • Platte County, Colorado Territory February 9, 1872 to February 9, 1874, was created from the eastern portion of Weld County The county was abolished two years later after organizers failed to secure voter approval, and the territory of the county was returned to Weld County

Counties created by the State of Coloradoedit

  • Carbonate County, Colorado February 8–10, 1879 Lake County was renamed Carbonate County in 1879 Only two days later, Carbonate County was split into the new Chaffee County and a reestablished Lake County
  • Uncompaghre County, Colorado February 27 to March 2, 1883 Ouray County was renamed Uncompaghre County for only four days in 1883
  • South Arapahoe County, Colorado November 15, 1902, to April 11, 1903, was one of three counties created from Arapahoe County in 1902 The name was changed back to Arapahoe County after five months

Connecticutedit

  • Westmoreland County, Connecticut see Pennamite–Yankee War and State of Westmoreland

Delawareedit

Sussex County, Delaware was formerly known as Deale County

District of Columbiaedit

See also: Wards of the District of Columbia

The United States Census Bureau and the Office of Management and Budget currently consider the District of Columbia to consist of a single county equivalent Otherwise the District of Columbia currently has no counties or county equivalents The former counties of the District of Columbia are:

  • Alexandria County, DC 1791–1846 retroceded to Virginia becoming Alexandria County, Virginia
  • Washington County, DC Abolished in 1871 and consolidated with the District of Columbia Under the current 2001, revised through 2005 District of Columbia Code, the entire District of Columbia is a single body corporate for municipal purposes; the code does not mention Washington County except to make the District of Columbia the successor in title to its property

Georgetown City and Washington City are former county equivalents The District of Columbia comprised three county equivalents when it was consolidated in 1871: Georgetown City, Washington City, and the Remainder of the District—as they are termed in the Ninth Census of the United States 1870 There had been four county equivalents in the District prior to the retrocession of Alexandria to Virginia in 1846 In its retrospective decennial population counts the Ninth Census lists four for 1840 back to 1810, Alexandria and Washington counties alone for 1800, and none for 1790 prior to the creation of the district

Floridaedit

  • Benton County, Florida, named for Missouri Senator Thomas Hart Benton in 1844, renamed Hernando County in 18507
  • Fayette County, Florida became parts of Jackson, Calhoun and Gulf counties in 1833
  • Mosquito County, Florida renamed Orange County, Florida in 1845
  • New River County, Florida renamed Bradford County, Florida in 1861

Georgiaedit

  • Bourbon County, Georgia organized by Georgia in 1785 out of disputed Yazoo lands in present-day Mississippi; dissolved in 1788
  • Campbell County, Georgia 1828–1931; merged with Fulton County
  • Cass County, Georgia 1832–1861; renamed Bartow County
  • Kinchafoonee County, Georgia 1853–1856; renamed Webster County
  • Milton County, Georgia 1857–1931; merged with Fulton County
  • Walton County 1803–1818; merged with Buncombe County, North Carolina

Idahoedit

  • Alturas County, Idaho 1864–1895 reduced greatly in size at creation of Elmore County and Logan County in 1889 In 1891, an attempt was made to transfer to Alta County, declared unconstitutional Transferred to Blaine County in 1895
  • Lah-Toh County, Idaho Territory 1864–1867 absorbed by Nez Perce and Kootenai County
  • Logan County, Idaho 1889–1895 In 1891, an attempt was made to transfer territory to Lincoln County and Alta County Act declared unconstitutional In 1895, the Idaho Legislature combined Logan and Alturas Counties into a new county called Blaine
  • Alta County created from Alturas in 1891, Act declared unconstitutional in May, 1891

Illinoisedit

Revolutionary eraedit

  • Illinois County, Virginia, formed in 1778 to govern Virginia's claims to present-day Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Wisconsin and eastern Minnesota; county abolished 5 January 1782; territory ceded by Virginia to Congress in March 1784 Its effective reach was limited to the French settlements at Cahokia, Kaskaskia, and Vincennes

Former counties of the Northwest and Indiana territoriesedit

Before Illinois Territory was created in 1809, it was part of the Northwest Territory from 1788 to 1800, and Indiana Territory from 1800 to 1809 At first, two counties of the Northwest Territory were created to govern what became the modern state of Illinois, followed by two others:

  • St Clair County, Northwest Territory established April 27, 1790, later St Clair County, Indiana Territory; upon the organization of Indiana Territory in 1800, St Clair County was enlarged to take in present-day Wisconsin, eastern Minnesota, and the western portion of Michigan's Upper Peninsula When Illinois Territory was set off from the Indiana Territory in 1809, St Clair County was included in the new government
  • Knox County, Northwest Territory, established June 20, 1790, later Knox County, Indiana Territory, 1800; its boundaries in 1795 included the eastern half of the future state of Illinois Portions of Knox County would be transferred to Michigan Territory upon its organization in 1805 and to Illinois Territory upon its organization in 1809; the remainder was included in the state of Indiana upon its achieving statehood in 1816
  • Randolph County, Northwest Territory, proclaimed 1795, from part of St Clair County; transferred to Indiana Territory in 1800 and Illinois Territory in 1809, now Randolph County, Illinois
  • Wayne County, Northwest Territory, proclaimed on August 15, 1796 following the British evacuation of Detroit; out of portions of Hamilton County, Northwest Territory and unorganized land, mostly in the present-day Lower Peninsula of Michigan This first Wayne County originally included a slice of the present Lake Michigan shoreline of Illinois, the site of present-day Chicago; its lands would be transferred to Knox County, Indiana Territory and later, the Illinois Territory Transferred to Indiana Territory in 1803 and to Michigan Territory in 1805

Counties organized by Illinois Territoryedit

Other counties were organized by the Illinois Territory from the lands of St Clair County between 1812 and 1819 and notionally included parts of the future Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin territories in their boundaries:

  • Madison County, Illinois Territory, 1813, from St Clair
  • Edwards County, Illinois Territory, 1815, from Madison
  • Crawford County, Illinois Territory, 1816, from Edwards
  • Bond County, Illinois Territory, 1817, from Madison

Before Illinois achieved statehood in 1818, the part of Illinois Territory excluded from the new state Wisconsin, eastern Minnesota, and the western Upper Peninsula of Michigan was transferred to Michigan Territory No county governments were included in this transfer

Indianaedit

Revolutionary eraedit

  • Illinois County, Virginia, formed in 1778 to govern Virginia's claims to present-day Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Wisconsin and eastern Minnesota; county abolished 5 January 1782; territory ceded by Virginia to Congress in March 1784 Its effective reach was limited to the French settlements at Cahokia, Kaskaskia, and Vincennes

Former counties of the Northwest and Indiana territoriesedit

Indiana Territory was created in 1800, and had since 1788 been part of the Northwest Territory; the new territory included modern-day Illinois, Indiana, Wisconsin and eastern Minnesota, as well at the western Upper Peninsula of Michigan At first, one county of the Northwest Territory had been created to govern what became the modern state of Indiana, and three others would be included in the Indiana Territory:

  • Knox County, Northwest Territory, established June 20, 1790, later Knox County, Indiana Territory, 1800; its boundaries in 1795 included the eastern half of the future state of Illinois, and its 1800 boundaries included the western half of Michigan's Lower Peninsula The northern portions of Knox County would be transferred to Michigan Territory upon its organization in 1805, and the westernmost to Illinois Territory upon its organization in 1809; the remainder was included in the state of Indiana upon its achieving statehood in 1816 The county's current form is that of Knox County, Indiana
  • St Clair County, Northwest Territory established April 27, 1790, later St Clair County, Indiana Territory; upon the organization of Indiana Territory in 1800, St Clair County was included in the new territory and enlarged to take in present-day Wisconsin, eastern Minnesota, and the western portion of Michigan's Upper Peninsula When Illinois Territory was set off from the Indiana Territory in 1809, St Clair County was included in the new government
  • Randolph County, Northwest Territory, proclaimed 1795, from part of St Clair County; transferred to Indiana Territory in 1800 and Illinois Territory in 1809, now Randolph County, Illinois
  • Wayne County, Northwest Territory, proclaimed on August 15, 1796 following the British evacuation of Detroit; out of portions of Hamilton County, Northwest Territory and unorganized land, mostly in the present-day Lower Peninsula of Michigan This first Wayne County originally included a slice of northern Indiana; all of Wayne County west of the present Indiana–Ohio line was transferred to Knox County, Indiana Territory in 1800 After losing other lands to the new state of Ohio, the remaining portion of Wayne County was transferred to Indiana Territory in 1803 and to Michigan Territory in 1805 The current Wayne County, Michigan is considered a successor of the 1796 establishment

Former districts of the Louisiana Territoryedit

  • District of Louisiana, attached to Indiana Territory October 1, 1804, pending the organization of Louisiana Territory, which took place July 4, 1805

Former counties of the State of Indianaedit

  • Richardville County, name changed to Howard County in 1859
  • Newton County, Indiana, Original Newton County abolished in 1839 Current County recreated in 1859 as the last county in Indiana

Iowaedit

Counties of Iowa created by Michigan Territoryedit

  • Des Moines County, Michigan Territory was organized in 1834, became part of Wisconsin Territory in 1836, and is now Des Moines County, Iowa
  • Dubuque County, Michigan Territory was organized in 1834, became part of Wisconsin Territory in 1836, and is now Dubuque County, Iowa

Counties of Iowa created by Wisconsin Territoryedit

  • Henry County, Wisconsin Territory, 1836; see Henry County, Iowa
  • Lee County, Wisconsin Territory, 1836; see Lee County, Iowa
  • Louisa County, Wisconsin Territory, 1836; see Louisa County, Iowa
  • Muscatine County, Wisconsin Territory, 1836; see Muscatine County, Iowa
  • Van Buren County, Wisconsin Territory, 1836; see Van Buren County, Iowa
  • Henry County, Wisconsin Territory, 1836; see Henry County, Iowa
  • Benton County, Wisconsin Territory, 1837; see Benton County, Iowa
  • Buchanan County, Wisconsin Territory, 1837; see Buchanan County, Iowa
  • Cedar County, Wisconsin Territory, 1837; see Cedar County, Iowa
  • Clayton County, Wisconsin Territory, 1837; see Clayton County, Iowa
  • Clinton County, Wisconsin Territory, 1837; see Clinton County, Iowa
  • Delaware County, Wisconsin Territory, 1837; see Delaware County, Iowa
  • Fayette County, Wisconsin Territory, 1837; see Fayette County, Iowa
  • Jackson County, Wisconsin Territory, 1837; see Jackson County, Iowa
  • Johnson County, Wisconsin Territory, 1837; see Johnson County, Iowa
  • Jones County, Wisconsin Territory, 1837; see Jones County, Iowa
  • Keokuk County, Wisconsin Territory, 1837; see Keokuk County, Iowa
  • Linn County, Wisconsin Territory, 1836; see Linn County, Iowa
  • Scott County, Wisconsin Territory, 1837; see Scott County, Iowa
  • Slaughter County, Wisconsin Territory, 1838; see Washington County, Iowa

Former counties of the State of Iowaedit

  • Bancroft County, Iowa was established in 1851 It was abolished in 1857 and the area was joined to Kossuth County
  • Crocker County, Iowa was created in 1870 out of Kossuth County from portions of what had been Bancroft County It was merged back into Kossuth County in 1871
  • Wahkaw County, Iowa was established on January 15, 1851; on January 12, 1853, its name was changed to Woodbury County

Kansasedit

Counties created by Kansas Territoryedit

Several counties were created by the government of Kansas Territory in its western reaches, which included the mining districts of Auraria and Pike's Peak None were ever organized, and all reverted to unorganized territory when Kansas achieved statehood in 1861 See also the Colorado section, above

  • Arapahoe County, Kansas Territory, covered all of western Kansas Territory when it was proclaimed on August 25, 1855 On February 7, 1859, the following counties were created from parts of Arapahoe County:
    • Broderick County, Kansas Territory
    • El Paso County, Kansas Territory
    • Fremont County, Kansas Territory
    • Montana County, Kansas Territory
    • Oro County, Kansas Territory
  • Peketon County, Kansas Territory was created on the same day that these counties were split off from Arapaho; like them, it was never organized and reverted to unorganized territory in 1861

Counties created by the State of Kansasedit

  • Garfield County, Kansas, now a part of Finney County
  • Howard County, Kansas 1875
  • Otoe County, Kansas

Kentuckyedit

Because Kentucky began as a political dependency of Virginia, its earliest counties were organized by that government See also Virginia & Virginia Colony, below

Historic counties created by Virginiaedit

  • Fincastle County, Virginia, proclaimed 1772, divided in 1776 into Montgomery, Washington, and Kentucky counties
  • Kentucky County, Virginia had boundaries much the same as today's Commonwealth of Kentucky

Modern counties created by Virginiaedit

In 1780, Kentucky County was divided by the Virginia government into three counties:

  • Fayette County, Kentucky
  • Jefferson County, Kentucky
  • Lincoln County, Kentucky

Between 1784 and 1788, six more counties would be created in Kentucky by the Virginia authorities:

  • Nelson County, Kentucky in 1784, from part of Jefferson County
  • Bourbon County, Kentucky in 1785, from part of Fayette County
  • Madison County, Kentucky in 1785, from part of Lincoln County
  • Mercer County, Kentucky in 1785, from part of Lincoln County
  • Mason County, Kentucky in 1788, from part of Bourbon County
  • Woodford County, Kentucky in 1788, from part of Fayette County

These nine counties gained statehood in 1792 as the Commonwealth of Kentucky

Former counties created by the Commonwealth of Kentuckyedit

  • Beckham County, Kentucky 1904 was dissolved by the Kentucky Court of Appeals on April 29, 1904, because it was not created in conformance with state law
  • Josh Bell County, Kentucky 1867–187, originally named for Joshua Fry Bell, called simply Bell County sometime before 1880

Louisianaedit

The Territory of Orleans was divided into 12 counties on 10 Apr 1805; these were reorganized into parishes on 31 Mar 1807:

  • Acadia County, Orleans Territory
  • Attakapas County, Orleans Territory
  • Concordia County, Orleans Territory
  • German Coast, Orleans Territory
  • Iberville County, Orleans Territory
  • LaFourche County, Orleans Territory
  • Natchitoches County, Orleans Territory
  • Opelousas County, Orleans Territory
  • Orleans County, Orleans Territory
  • Ouachita County, Orleans Territory
  • Pointe Coupée County, Orleans Territory
  • Rapides County, Orleans Territory
See also: List of parishes of Louisiana

Former parishesedit

  • Biloxi Parish formed in 1811 from West Florida territory It was eliminated in 1812 when part of the former West Florida area was transferred to Mississippi Territory8
  • Carroll Parish formed in 1838 from part of Ouachita Parish In 1877, it was divided into East Carroll Parish and West Carroll Parish8
  • Feliciana Parish formed in 1810 from West Florida territory In 1824, it was divided into East Feliciana Parish and West Feliciana Parish8
  • Pascagoula Parish formed in 1811 from West Florida territory It was eliminated in 1812 when part of the former West Florida area was transferred to Mississippi Territory8
  • Warren Parish formed in 1811 from part of Concordia Parish, and merged into Concordia Parish and Ouachita Parish in 18148

Maineedit

  • Cornwall County, Province of New York, established 1665, transferred to the Dominion of New England in 1686; to the Province of Massachusetts Bay in 1692 and absorbed into York County see below
  • Devonshire County, Massachusetts Bay Colony 1674–1675

Counties organized by Massachusetts in the future State of Maineedit

The following counties of Massachusetts were organized by the 1780 constitution into the District of Maine, which became a state in 1820:

  • York County, Massachusetts, created 1652 as "Yorkshire County" and renamed "York County" in 1668
  • Lincoln County, Massachusetts, created 1760
  • Cumberland County, Massachusetts, created 1761
  • Hancock County, Massachusetts, created 1790
  • Washington County, Massachusetts, created 1790
  • Kennebec County, Massachusetts, created 1799
  • Oxford County, Massachusetts, created 1805
  • Somerset County, Massachusetts, created 1809
  • Penobscot County, Massachusetts, created 1817

See also Massachusetts, below

Marylandedit

  • Charles County: formed in 1650 from part of Saint Mary's County Abolished in 1654 Referred to as Old Charles County
  • Durham County: formed in 1669 from part of Somerset County and nonorganized territory Abolished in 1672 and incorporated in Worcester County
  • Worcester County: formed in 1672 from part of Durham County and nonorganized territory Lost in 1685 when Delaware Colony was established

Massachusettsedit

Former counties of the colonial eraedit

  • Norfolk County, Massachusetts Bay Colony, an original county of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, established 1643; divided in 1680 between Essex County and the newly formed Province of New Hampshire; no connection with the Norfolk County organized in 1793
  • Devonshire County, Massachusetts Bay Colony 1674–1675

Counties transferred from other coloniesedit

  • Cornwall County, Province of New York, transferred to Massachusetts in 1686
  • Dukes County, Province of New York, transferred to Massachusetts in 1691

Counties organized by Massachusetts in the future State of Maineedit

The following counties of Massachusetts were organized by the 1780 constitution into the District of Maine, which became a state in 1820:

  • York County, Massachusetts, created 1652 as "Yorkshire County" and renamed "York County" in 1668
  • Lincoln County, Massachusetts, created 1760
  • Cumberland County, Massachusetts, created 1761
  • Hancock County, Massachusetts, created 1790
  • Washington County, Massachusetts, created 1790
  • Kennebec County, Massachusetts, created 1799
  • Oxford County, Massachusetts, created 1805
  • Somerset County, Massachusetts, created 1809
  • Penobscot County, Massachusetts, created 1817

Michiganedit

Revolutionary eraedit

  • Illinois County, Virginia, formed 1778 in support of Virginia's claim to present-day Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Wisconsin and eastern Minnesota; abolished 5 January 1782; territory ceded by Virginia to Congress in March 1784 Throughout this time, Detroit and Fort St Joseph present-day Niles, Michigan were occupied by British forces, and Virginia's jurisdiction in the region was therefore limited to the French settlements of Cahokia, Kaskaskia and Vincennes, far to the south of Michigan

Former counties of the Northwest, Indiana and Illinois territoriesedit

  • Wayne County, Northwest Territory, proclaimed on August 15, 1796 following the British evacuation of Detroit; out of portions of Hamilton County, Northwest Territory and unorganized land This first Wayne County originally encompassed all of Michigan's Lower Peninsula, including northwestern Ohio, northern Indiana, and a small portion of the present Lake Michigan shoreline of Illinois, the site of present-day Chicago In 1800, the area west of the extension of the present Indiana–Ohio border became part of Knox County, Indiana Territory, and a section in the east of the county's Ohio lands was included as part of the new Trumbull County This first Wayne County was split upon Ohio's achievement of statehood in 1803; north of the Ordinance Line became part of Indiana Territory as a reorganized Wayne County; the county's remaining lands in Ohio briefly reverted to an unorganized status
  • Wayne County, Indiana Territory, established 1803 as a revival of the former county government, and included in Michigan Territory upon its creation in 1805
  • Knox County, Indiana Territory, established as Knox County, Northwest Territory in 1790; upon the organization of Indiana Territory, Knox County was enlarged to take in the western side of the Lower Peninsula and a large slice of the Upper Peninsula It is unknown if Knox County ever exercised jurisdiction over its lands in the future Michigan
  • St Clair County, Indiana Territory, established as St Clair County, Northwest Territory in 1790; upon the organization of Indiana Territory, St Clair County was enlarged to take in the western portion of the Upper Peninsula When Illinois Territory was set off from the Indiana Territory in 1809, St Clair County was included in the new government It can be presumed that this St Clair County never exercised jurisdiction over its share of the future Michigan, due to the lack of non-native settlers

Other counties organized by the Illinois Territory between 1809 and 1819, including Madison, Crawford, Bond, and Edwards, notionally included parts of the future Michigan and Wisconsin territories in their boundaries, but do not appear to have exercised jurisdiction north of the current state line

Former districts of Michigan Territoryedit

The first governor of Michigan Territory, William Hull, declared a county government into existence shortly after assuming power in 1805, but on the same day, ordered that four districts be organized:

  • District of Detroit, the area surrounding the settlement at Detroit; in practice, this district was combined with the Huron district
  • District of Erie, the area south of the Huron River and centered on present-day Monroe
  • District of Huron, the area north of Detroit, encompassing today's Thumb Michigan and Mid-Michigan
  • District of Michilimackinac, centered on the Straits of Mackinac and covering the northern half of the Lower Peninsula

Judicial acts and militia organization took place at the district level; the vestigial county government was never organized District government lapsed after the British occupation of Detroit and Mackinac in 1812; following the recapture of Detroit in 1813, Hull's replacement as governor by American reckoning, Lewis Cass, abolished the district scheme In 1815, the current Wayne County was organized; the county government traces its lineage to the 1796 county of that name

Former counties of Michigan Territoryedit

  • Brown County, Michigan Territory, organized 1818, transferred to Wisconsin Territory in 1836, now Brown County, Wisconsin
  • Crawford County, Michigan Territory, organized 1818, transferred to Wisconsin Territory in 1836, now Crawford County, Wisconsin
  • Des Moines County, Michigan Territory, organized 1834, transferred to Wisconsin Territory in 1836 and Iowa Territory in 1838, now Des Moines County, Iowa
  • Dubuque County, Michigan Territory, organized 1834, transferred to Wisconsin Territory in 1836 and Iowa Territory in 1838, now Dubuque County, Iowa
  • Iowa County, Michigan Territory, organized 1829, transferred to Wisconsin Territory in 1836, now Iowa County, Wisconsin
  • Milwaukee County, Michigan Territory, organized 1835, transferred to Wisconsin Territory in 1836, now Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

Former counties of the State of Michiganedit

  • Isle Royale County, Michigan, abolished in 1897, assigned to Keweenaw County, Michigan
  • Manitou County, Michigan, abolished in 1895, divided between Charlevoix and Leelanau counties
  • Omeena County, Michigan, established in 1840, abolished in 1853, assigned to Grand Traverse County
  • Washington County, Michigan, formed in 1867 from Marquette County, Michigan but declared unconstitutional

Minnesotaedit

  • Manomin County, Minnesota 1857–1858 disorganized and shifted between three counties it became part of Anoka County in 1869–1870
  • Monongalia County, Minnesota 1861–1870 merged with Kandiyohi County
  • Pembina County, Minnesota Territory 1849–1858, reconstituted as Pembina County, Dakota Territory in 1861, eventually reduced to present-day Pembina County, North Dakota

Mississippiedit

  • Bourbon County, Georgia organized by Georgia in 1785 out of disputed Yazoo lands in present-day Mississippi; dissolved in 1788
  • Pearl County, Mississippi 1872–1878, later reformed as Pearl River County in 1890

Three Alabama counties were established in the Mississippi Territory that preceded the two states: Baldwin County, Alabama; Madison County, Alabama; Washington County, Alabama

Missouriedit

  • Clark County, Missouri 1818–1819 Not the same as the current Clark County, Missouri
  • Dodge County, Missouri 1849–1853
  • Hempstead County, Missouri 1818–1819
  • Lillard County, Missouri 1821–1825

Montanaedit

  • Edgerton County, Montana, created by the Territorial Legislature in 1865, renamed Lewis and Clark County in 1867

Nevadaedit

  • Bullfrog County, Nevada, created from a small portion of Nye County, Nevada in 1987, reabsorbed in 1989 Population: 0
  • Ormsby County, Nevada, now independent city of Carson City
  • Pautah County, California – created by the California legislature out of territory the state believed would be ceded to it north of Lake Tahoe, but which was given to Nevada County never officially organized
  • Roop County, Nevada – Portions west of 120°W became Lassen County, California, remainder annexed by Washoe County, Nevada in 1883 Also known as Lake County

New Hampshireedit

  • Norfolk County, Massachusetts Colony 1643–1679 – became Essex County, Massachusetts and the entire state of New Hampshire

New Mexicoedit

  • Santa Ana County, New Mexico Territory 1844–1876 absorbed by Bernalillo County

New Yorkedit

See also: Counties of New York
  • Charlotte County, Province of New York renamed and partitioned See Washington County, New York
  • Cornwall County, Province of New York transferred to Massachusetts in 1686
  • Cumberland County, Province of New York claimed by and transferred to Vermont, unclear if ever implemented or administered See Albany County, New York
  • Dukes County, Province of New York transferred to Massachusetts in 1691
  • Gloucester County, New York claimed by and transferred to Vermont, unclear if ever implemented or administered
  • Tryon County, New York renamed and partitioned See also: Montgomery County, New York
  • Yorkshire County, Province of New York original English county, partitioned in 1683 into Kings, Queens including modern Nassau, Suffolk, Richmond and Westchester including modern Bronx counties

North Carolinaedit

Counties formed by the colonial governmentedit

  • Albemarle County, North Carolina, created 1664, abolished 1739
  • Bath County, North Carolina, created 1696, abolished 1739
  • Dobbs County, North Carolina, created 1758, effective 1759; lost territory to Wayne County in 1779, remainder of county divided in 1791 between Glasgow see below and Lenoir counties
  • Bute County, North Carolina, created 1764, divided in 1779 into Franklin and Warren counties
  • Tryon County, North Carolina created 1768, effective 1769; divided in 1779 into Lincoln and Rutherford counties

Counties transferred to Federal jurisdiction, 1790edit

Seven counties were established by the State of North Carolina in its western territories following independence; the entire overmountain area the former Washington District, was transferred to Federal jurisdiction in 1790 and formed into the Territory South of the River Ohio The so-called Southwest Territory would achieve statehood in 1796, as Tennessee

  • Washington County, North Carolina, established 1777
  • Sullivan County, North Carolina, established 1779
  • Davidson County, North Carolina, established 1783
  • Greene County, North Carolina, established 1783
  • Hawkins County, North Carolina, established 1786
  • Sumner County, North Carolina, established 1786
  • Tennessee County, established 1788, divided at Tennessee statehood in 1796 into Montgomery County, Tennessee and Robertson County, Tennessee

Renamed countiesedit

  • Glasgow County, North Carolina – renamed Greene County after 1798

North Dakotaedit

  • Pembina County, Minnesota Territory 1849–1858, reconstituted as Pembina County, Dakota Territory in 1861, eventually reduced to present-day Pembina County, North Dakota
  • Wallace County, North Dakota 1883–1889 under Dakota Territory, 1889–1896, 1901–1905 under North Dakota, created from Howard County, Dakota Territory, extinct in 1896 from Billings and Stark counties, recreated in 1901 but again absorbed into McKenzie county in 1905

Ohioedit

  • Illinois County, Virginia, formed in 1778 and constituted most of present-day Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, and Wisconsin; abolished 5 January 1782; territory ceded by Virginia to Congress in March 1784; see Illinois Country

Oklahomaedit

  • Swanson County, Oklahoma 1910–1911

Indian Territoryedit

Chickasaw Nationedit

  • Tishomingo County
  • Pontotoc County
  • Pickens County
  • Ponola County

Choctaw Nationedit

  • Apukshunnubbee District:
    • Bok Tuklo County
    • Cedar County
    • Eagle County
    • Nashoba County
    • Red River County
    • Towson County
    • Wade County
  • Moshulatubbee District
    • Gaines County
    • Sans Bois County
    • Skullyville County
    • Sugar Loaf County
    • Tobucksy County
  • Pushmataha District
    • Atoka County
    • Blue County
    • Jack's Fork County
    • Jackson County
    • Kiamitia County Kiamichi County

Oklahoma Territoryedit

  • Beaver County, Oklahoma Territory
  • Day County, Oklahoma Territory Abolished at Oklahoma statehood Split into Roger Mills County and Ellis County
  • Greer County, Texas 1888–1895, transferred to Oklahoma Territory under a Supreme Court decision

Oregonedit

  • Umpqua County, Oregon created 1851, gradually reduced in size until 1862, when what remained was incorporated into Douglas County9
  • Champooik or Champoeg County, one of the four original districts into which the Oregon Country was divided in 1843; Renamed Marion County in 184910
  • Twality, Tuality or Falatine County, one of the four original districts into which the Oregon Country was divided in 1843; Renamed Washington County in 184911

Pennsylvaniaedit

  • Ontario County, 1810–1812 renamed Bradford County

South Carolinaedit

Beware: South Carolina legally dissolved all overarching "districts" which often included multiple counties in 1800 Nevertheless, surviving counties were often referred to incorrectly as "districts" as late as the 1860s
  • Bartholomew County created in 1785 from Charleston District Abolished 179112
  • Beaufort District created in 1768 from Granville County Abolished 180012
  • Berkeley 1 County created in 1682 from Craven County Abolished 176812
  • Berkeley 2 County created in 1785 from Charleston District Abolished 1791 The third version of Berkeley County was created in 1882 and remains today12
  • Camden District created in 1768 from Craven County Abolished 180012
  • Carteret County created in 1684 from Colleton County Abolished 170812
  • Charles Town District created in 1768 from Berkeley and Colleton Counties It was renamed Charleston District in 1785, and abolished in 180012
  • Charleston 1 County created in 1785 from Charleston District Abolished 1791 A second Charleston County was created in 1800 and remains today12
  • Cheraws District created in 1768 from Craven County Abolished 180012
  • Claremont County created in 1785 from Camden County Abolished 180012
  • Clarendon 1 County created in 1785 from Camden County Its county seat was in Jamesville Abolished 1800 Clarendon 2 County was reestablished in 1855 with its county seat in Manning and remains today12
  • Colleton 1 County created in 1682 from Craven County Abolished 176812
  • Colleton 2 County created in 1785 from Charleston District Abolished 1791 A third Colleton County was created in 1800 from Charleston District and remains today12
  • Craven County was part of Carolina's first charter in 1664 Abolished 176812
  • Georgetown District created in 1768 from Craven County Abolished 180012
  • Granville 1 County created in 1708 from Carteret County Abolished 176812
  • Granville 2 County created in 1785 from Beaufort District Abolished 179112
  • Hilton County created in 1785 from Beaufort District Abolished 179112
  • Kingston County created in 1785 from Georgetown District Abolished 180112
  • Lewisburg County created in 1785 from Orangeburg District Abolished 179112
  • Lexington 1 County created in 1785 from Orangeburg District Abolished 1791 Lexington 2 County was reestablished in 1804 from Orangeburg County and remains today12
  • Liberty County created in 1785 from Georgetown District Abolished 179812
  • Lincoln County created in 1785 from Beaufort District Abolished 179112
  • Marion County created in 1785 from Charleston District Abolished 179112
  • Ninety-six District created in 1768 from Indian lands Abolished 180012
  • Orangeburgh District created in 1768 from Orangeburgh Township and Amelia Township Spelling officially changed to Orangeburg District in 1783 Abolished 180012
  • Orange County created in 1785 from Orangeburg District Abolished 1791 Note: Orangeburg County was created in 1791 from Orangeburg District and remains today12
  • Pendleton County was created in 1789 from Cherokee Indian lands It was joined to the overarching Washington District in 1791 along with Greenville County In 1798 Washington District was renamed Pendleton District an overarching district including Pendleton County and Greenville County In 1800 South Carolina abolished all the overarching districts So in 1800 only the separate Pendleton County and Greenville County emerged The remaining Pendleton County was abolished in 182612
  • Pendleton District was created in 1798 by renaming Washington District This overarching Pendleton District was dissolved two years later in 1800 However Pendleton County remained and emerged from a part of Pendleton District Pendleton County was abolished 182612
  • Pinckney District created in 1791 from Ninety-six District and Cheraws District Abolished 180012
  • Salem County created in 1792 from Claremont County and Clarendon County Abolished 180012
  • Shrewsbury County created in 1785 from Beaufort District Abolished 179112
  • Spartan County created in 1785 from Ninety-six District Changed to Spartanburg County in 1791 and remains today12
  • Washington County created in 1785 from Charleston District Abolished 179112
  • Washington District created in 1791 from Cherokee Indian lands Washington District included Greenville County created 1786 and Pendleton County created 1789 Washington District was renamed in 1798 to Pendleton District12
  • Winton County created in 1785 from Orangeburg District Abolished 179112
  • Winyah County created in 1785 from Georgetown District Abolished 180012

South Dakotaedit

  • Washabaugh County, South Dakota 1889–1979 The eastern part of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation is now under the control of Jackson County
  • Armstrong County, South Dakota Armstrong County was disorganized in 1952
  • Washington County, South Dakota, a former county 1883–1943 that was divided and then merged into Jackson County, Pennington County, and Shannon County in 1943 because of financial troubles in South Dakota
  • Shannon County, South Dakota 1875–2015 renamed Oglala Lakota County by referendum in 2014

Tennesseeedit

  • James County, Tennessee 1870–1919 – Now part of Hamilton County and Bradley County The county seat was Ooltewah
  • Tennessee County, North Carolina 1788–1796 – A North Carolina county that was divided and renamed Montgomery County and Robertson County when Tennessee achieved statehood to lessen confusion These counties still exist but were eventually subdivided further

Texasedit

  • Buchanan County, Texas 1858–1861, renamed to Stephens County
  • Buchel County, Texas 1887–1897, formed from part of Presidio County, absorbed by Brewster County
  • Dawson County defunct, Texas 1858–1866, became parts of Uvalde and Kinney counties; not to be confused with present-day Dawson County
  • Davis County, Texas 1861–1871, reverted to previously named Cass County
  • Encinal County, Texas 1856–1899, absorbed by Webb County
  • Foley County, Texas 1887–1897, formed from part of Presidio County, absorbed by Brewster County
  • Greer County, Texas 1888–1895, transferred to Oklahoma Territory under a Supreme Court decision
  • Harrisburg County, Texas 1836–1839, renamed to Harris County
  • Miller County, Arkansas Territory 1820–1825, became part of Indian Territory and present-day Texas
  • Navasota County, Texas 1841–1842, renamed to Brazos County
  • Santa Fe County, Texas 1848–1850, abolished November 25, 1850; land ceded to United States in compliance with Compromise of 1850
  • Wegefarth County, Texas 1873–1876, abolished by Texas Legislature
  • Worth County, Texas 1850, formed from part of Santa Fe County, abolished November 25, 1850; land ceded to United States in compliance with Compromise of 1850

Utahedit

In 1849 most Great Basin settlers asked for admission to the Union as the State of Deseret In 1850 Congress responded by reducing her size and organizing Utah Territory In 1896 Utah became a state

  • Carson County, Utah Territory created 1854 from parts of Weber, Desert, Tooele, Juab, Millard, Iron counties In 1861 Nevada Territory took jurisdiction and Carson County was extinguished Nevada erected Carson City Independent City, Douglas, Lake, Lyon, Ormsby, Roop, Storey, Washoe, and parts of Churchill, Esmeralda, Humboldt, Mineral, Nye, and Pershing counties from her land1314151617
  • Cedar County, Utah Territory created 1856 from part of Utah County Discontinuted 1862; her land parted into Tooele County and Utah County151819
  • Desert County, Utah Territory created 1852 extending from Salt Lake to California Reduced in 1856, extinguished 1862; her land parted into Box Elder and Tooele counties1314151820
  • Greasewood County, Utah Territory created 1856 from part of Weber County Discontinued 1862 and her land given to Box Elder County131518
  • Great Salt Lake County, Utah Territory created 1850; expanded 1852 to Colorado border; reduced 1856; in 1866 reduced again to her present borders and name changed to Salt Lake County1520
  • Green River County, Utah Territory created 1852 included big parts of present-day Colorado and Wyoming Summit County carved out 1854; in 1856 Malad, Box Elder, and Cache counties peeled off, but Green River County expanded into Salt Lake, Utah, and Sanpete counites; 1861 parts of Colorado and Wyoming shaved off; 1862 Morgan and Wasatch counties trimmed off; 1864 Rich County sliced out; 1868 last part of Wyoming cut out; 1872 Green River County was dissolved, and her land ceded to Summit County1315182021
  • Humboldt County, Utah Territory formed 1856 from Weber, Desert, Tooele, and Juab counties Nevada took jurisdiction in 1861 forming her own Humboldt County, Nevada to the northeast On the former Humboldt County's land, Nevada formed parts of her own Humboldt, Churchill, Elko, Eureka, Lander, and Pershing counties1314151618
  • Little Salt Lake County, Utah Territory created 1850 with undefined boundaries on unsettled land In 1852 the legislature redefined the area as Iron County1315
  • Malad County, Utah Territory created 1856 from part of Weber County Discontinued 1862, her land ceded to Box Elder County13151822
  • Richland County, Utah Territory formed 1864 from parts of Cache, Summit, and Green River counties In 1868 part was given to Wyoming and the rest renamed Rich County1315
  • Rio Virgin County, Utah Territory created 1869 from Washington County Discontinued 1872 after a survey showed most of it was in Nevada and Arizona Territory1518
  • Saint Mary's County, Utah Territory formed 1856 from parts of Weber, Desert, Tooele, and Juab counties In 1861 Nevada Territory took jurisdiction and Saint Mary's ended On Saint Mary's land, Nevada created parts of Elko, Eureka, and White Pine counties1314151618
  • Shambip County, Utah Territory created 1856 from part of Tooele County Discontinued 1862 and her land reverted to Tooele County151618

Vermontedit

  • Cumberland County, Republic of Vermont 1771–1781
  • Cumberland County, Province of New York claimed by and transferred to Vermont, unclear if ever implemented or administered See Albany County, New York
  • Gloucester County, New York claimed by and transferred to Vermont, unclear if ever implemented or administered
  • Washington County, Republic of Vermont 1781–1782 land now in New Hampshire; Vermont relinquished claim; there is a present-day "new" Washington County, Vermont

Virginiaedit

See also: Former counties, cities, and towns of Virginia
  • Alexandria County, DC retroceded to Virginia, most of which now comprises Arlington County, Virginia with a portion becoming part of Alexandria, Virginia
  • Elizabeth City County, Virginia incorporated into the independent city of Hampton in 1952
  • Fincastle County, Virginia land now part of Kentucky
  • Illinois County, Virginia, formed in 1778 and constituted most of present-day Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, and Wisconsin; abolished 5 January 1782; territory ceded by Virginia to Congress in March 1784
  • Kentucky County, Virginia 1777–1780 land that later became the state of Kentucky in 1792
  • Lower Norfolk County Colonial Virginia in 1691, divided into Norfolk County, Virginia and Princess Anne County, Virginia
  • Nansemond County, Virginia became independent city of Nansemond in 1972; merged with independent city of Suffolk in 1974
  • New Norfolk County Colonial Virginia Formed in 1636 from Elizabeth River Shire, divided into Lower Norfolk County and Upper Norfolk County in 1637
  • Norfolk County, Virginia Formed in 1691 from part of Lower Norfolk County, was merged with independent city of South Norfolk to become new independent city of Chesapeake in 1963
  • Old Rappahannock County Province of Virginia Founded in 1656 from part of Lancaster County and became extinct in 1692 when it was separated to form Essex County and Richmond County
  • Princess Anne County, Virginia Formed in 1691 from part of Lower Norfolk County, was merged with independent city of Virginia Beach in 1963
  • Upper Norfolk County Colonial Virginia renamed Nansemond County in 1642; see Nansemond County for subsequent history
  • Warwick River County, Virginia renamed Warwick County in 1642; became independent city of Warwick in 1952; merged with independent city of Newport News in 1958
  • Yohogania County, Virginia 1776–1779 land now in Pennsylvania and West Virginia

West Virginiaedit

See Virginia & Virginia Colony, above

Wisconsinedit

Revolutionary-era claims of Virginiaedit

  • Illinois County, Virginia, formed in 1778 and constituting Virginia's claimed lands in present-day Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, and Wisconsin; abolished 5 January 1782; territory ceded by Virginia to Congress in March 1784; see Illinois Country and Northwest Territory Wisconsin's non-native settlements of this era were peopled by British and Canadian fur traders, and it is unclear if Virginia ever attempted to exercise its jurisdiction in today's Wisconsin

Counties of Wisconsin created by Michigan Territoryedit

  • Brown County, Michigan Territory, 1818; see Brown County, Wisconsin
  • Crawford County, Michigan Territory, 1818; see Crawford County, Wisconsin
  • Iowa County, Michigan Territory, 1829; see Iowa County, Wisconsin
  • Milwaukee County, Michigan Territory, 1835; see Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

Counties of Iowa created by Michigan Territory and transferred to Wisconsin Territoryedit

  • Des Moines County, Michigan Territory, 1834; see Des Moines County, Iowa
  • Dubuque County, Michigan Territory, 1834; see Dubuque County, Iowa

Counties of Iowa created by Wisconsin Territoryedit

  • Henry County, Wisconsin Territory, 1836; see Henry County, Iowa
  • Lee County, Wisconsin Territory, 1836; see Lee County, Iowa
  • Louisa County, Wisconsin Territory, 1836; see Louisa County, Iowa
  • Muscatine County, Wisconsin Territory, 1836; see Muscatine County, Iowa
  • Van Buren County, Wisconsin Territory, 1836; see Van Buren County, Iowa
  • Henry County, Wisconsin Territory, 1836; see Henry County, Iowa
  • Benton County, Wisconsin Territory, 1837; see Benton County, Iowa
  • Buchanan County, Wisconsin Territory, 1837; see Buchanan County, Iowa
  • Cedar County, Wisconsin Territory, 1837; see Cedar County, Iowa
  • Clayton County, Wisconsin Territory, 1837; see Clayton County, Iowa
  • Clinton County, Wisconsin Territory, 1837; see Clinton County, Iowa
  • Delaware County, Wisconsin Territory, 1837; see Delaware County, Iowa
  • Fayette County, Wisconsin Territory, 1837; see Fayette County, Iowa
  • Jackson County, Wisconsin Territory, 1837; see Jackson County, Iowa
  • Johnson County, Wisconsin Territory, 1837; see Johnson County, Iowa
  • Jones County, Wisconsin Territory, 1837; see Jones County, Iowa
  • Keokuk County, Wisconsin Territory, 1837; see Keokuk County, Iowa
  • Linn County, Wisconsin Territory, 1836; see Linn County, Iowa
  • Scott County, Wisconsin Territory, 1837; see Scott County, Iowa
  • Slaughter County, Wisconsin Territory, 1838; see Washington County, Iowa

See alsoedit

  • History portal
  • United States portal
  • United States of America
    • Outline of the United States
    • Index of United States-related articles
    • Book:United States
  • Historic regions of the United States
  • List of former sovereign states of North America

Referencesedit

  1. ^ Mitchell, Elaine B, ed 1975 Alaska Blue Book Second ed Juneau: Alaska Department of Education, Division of State Libraries p 141 
  2. ^ Miller, Marian 1997-06-09 "An Outline History of Juneau Municipal Government" Historic Preservation in Juneau City and Borough of Juneau Retrieved 2012-05-08 
  3. ^ "Certificate of Organization of the Unified Home Rule Municipality of the City and Borough of Sitka" PDF Alaska Department of Commerce, Community and Economic Development, Division of Community and Regional Affairs 1990-06-18 Archived from the original PDF on 2010-06-15 Retrieved 2012-05-08 
  4. ^ Stout, Scot 2012-03-07 "Early History of the County Seats and Courthouses of Clay County, Arkansas" ARGenWeb: Arkansas Genealogy Resources Online The ARGenWeb Project Retrieved 2012-05-08 
  5. ^ Acts and Resolutions of the General Assembly of the State of Arkansas Session from January 12 to March 28, 1885 ed Little Rock, AK: AM Woodruff 1885 p 41 Retrieved 2012-05-08 
  6. ^ Acts, Resolutions and Memorials of the General Assembly of the State of Arkansas Session from November 1 to December 15, 1875 ed Little Rock, AK: PA Ladue 1876 pp 129–131 Retrieved 2012-05-08 
  7. ^ Exploring Florida Hernando County Maps
  8. ^ a b c d e Bryansite - Louisiana parishes
  9. ^ Douglas County in McArthur, Lewis A; Lewis L McArthur 2003 1928 Oregon Geographic Names Seventh ed Portland, Oregon: Oregon Historical Society Press ISBN 0-87595-277-1 trade paperback, ISBN 0-87595-278-X hardcover 
  10. ^ Marion County in McArthur 2003
  11. ^ Washington County in McArthur 2003
  12. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak JD Lewis, "The Counties from 1664 to Present - In Alphabetical Order" South Carolina – The Counties, http://wwwcarolanacom/SC/Counties/sc_counties_alphabetical_orderhtml accessed January 26, 2011
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Chart of County Formation in Utah" in Division of Archives and Records Service at http://archivesutahgov/research/guides/county-formationhtm accessed 11 August 2011
  14. ^ a b c d John Koontz, Political History of Nevada, 5th ed Carson City, Nev: SPO, 1965, 34-98
  15. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Deon C Greer, Atlas of Utah Ogden, Utah: Utah State College, 1981, 162-64
  16. ^ a b c d "Counties of Nevada" in Nevada History: a Walk in the Past at http://nevada-historyorg/countyhtml accessed 7 August 2011
  17. ^ Handybook for Genealogists: United States of America, 10th ed Draper, Utah: Everton Pub, 2002, 442
  18. ^ a b c d e f g h i Handybook, 686-88
  19. ^ Utah Division of Archives and Records Service "Cedar County Utah Probate Court Minutes" in Division of Archives and Records Service at http://wwwarchivesstateutus/research/inventories/17493html accessed 10 August 2011
  20. ^ a b c Utah Territory Legislative Assembly, Acts, resolutions, and memorials, passed by the first annual, and special sessions, of the Legislative Assembly, of the Territory of Utah, begun and held at Great Salt Lake City, on the 22nd day of September, AD, 1851 1852 GSL City, UT: Legislative Assembly, 1852, 162-63 Internet Archive edition
  21. ^ Legislative Assembly of the Territory of Utah, Acts, resolutions, and memorials passed and adopted by the Legislative Assembly of the Territory of Utah at the twelfth annual session 1872 Salt Lake City: Tribune Printing and Publ Co, 1872, 28 Google books edition
  22. ^ Legislative Assembly of the Territory of Utah, Acts, resolutions and memorials passed at the annual sessions of the Legislative Assembly of the Territory of Utah convened    1855 Great Salt Lake City, 1855, 7 Google books edition

External linksedit

  • Ghost Counties: Your Guide to America's Dead, Forgotten Countiesdead link
  • Atlas of Historical County Boundaries
  • Handbook of Texas Online: DEFUNCT COUNTIES
  • Iowa's Defunct Counties
  • Defunct Kansas Counties
  • Ancestrycom: County Boundaries & Boundary Changes
  • Formation of South Carolina Counties
  • SDGENWEB Extinct County Selection List
  • Virginia Counties
  • Missing Counties of Virginia
  • Extinct Louisiana parishes and counties


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