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Crinan Canal

The Crinan Canal between Crinan and Ardrishaig in Argyll and Bute in the west of Scotland is operated by Scottish Canals The canal, which opened in 1801, takes its name from the village of Crinan at its western end Approximately nine miles 14 km long, the canal connects the village of Ardrishaig on Loch Gilp with the Sound of Jura, providing a navigable route between the Clyde and the Inner Hebrides, without the need for a long diversion around the Kintyre peninsula, and in particular the exposed Mull of Kintyre1 Contents 1 History 2 Features 3 Popular culture 4 See also 5 References...

Caledonian Canal

The Caledonian Canal connects the Scottish east coast at Inverness with the west coast at Corpach near Fort William in Scotland The canal was constructed in the early nineteenth century by Scottish engineer Thomas Telford, and is a sister canal of the Göta Canal in Sweden, also constructed by Telford Contents 1 Route 2 History 3 Operation 4 Names 5 Points of interest 6 References 61 Bibliography 7 External links Routeedit The canal runs some 60 miles 97 km from northeast to southwest Only one third of the entire length is man-made, the rest being formed by Loch Dochfour, Loch N...

Ulster Canal

The Ulster Canal is a disused canal running through part of County Armagh, County Tyrone and County Fermanagh in Northern Ireland and County Monaghan in the Republic of Ireland In the early 19th century the idea of linking the lowlands around Lough Neagh with the Erne Basin and the River Shannon system became popular with the more progressive landowners and merchants of Armagh, Monaghan and Fermanagh The Ulster Canal was built between 1825 and 1842 and was 74 km 46 mi long with 26 locks It ran from Charlemont on the River Blackwater to Wattle Bridge on the River Finn, south-east of U...

Strabane Canal

The Strabane Canal is a short four mile canal in County Tyrone, Northern Ireland It connected the market town of Strabane to the navigable River Foyle and thence to the port of Londonderry on the north coast of Ireland The canal opened in 1796 and closed in 1962 Contents 1 History 11 Operation 12 Decline 2 Restoration 3 Current status 4 See also 5 Bibliography 51 References Historyedit The Strabane Canal was conceived by the Marquess of Abercorn as a way of encouraging industrial and commercial development in Strabane and its immediate surroundings, most of which was within his e...

Shannon–Erne Waterway

The Shannon–Erne Waterway Irish: Uiscebhealach na Sionainne is na hÉirne; Ulster-Scots: Shannon–Erne Wattèrgate is a canal linking the River Shannon in the Republic of Ireland with the River Erne in Northern Ireland Managed by Waterways Ireland, the canal is 63 km 39 mi in length, has sixteen locks and runs from Leitrim village in County Leitrim to Upper Lough Erne in County Fermanagh The official opening of the Shannon–Erne Waterway took place at Corraguil Lock, Teemore, County Fermanagh on 23 May 1994 Contents 1 History 2 Decline 3 A new waterway 4 Course of the waterway 5 Map...

Newry Canal

The Newry Canal, located in Northern Ireland, was built to link the Tyrone coalfields via Lough Neagh and the River Bann to the Irish Sea at Carlingford Lough near Newry It was the first summit level canal to be built in Ireland or Great Britain, 1 and pre-dated the more famous Bridgewater Canal by nearly thirty years and Sankey Brook by fifteen years It was authorised by the Commissioners of Inland Navigation for Ireland, and was publicly funded It was opened in 1742, but there were issues with the lock construction, the width of the summit level and the water supply Below Newry, a ship canal...

Lagan Canal

The Lagan Canal was a 27-mile 43 km canal built to connect Belfast to Lough Neagh The first section, which is a river navigation, was opened in 1763, and linked Belfast to Lisburn The second section from Lisburn to Lough Neagh includes a small amount of river navigation, but was largely built as a canal At its peak it was one of the most successful of the Irish canals,1 but ultimately it was unable to compete with road and rail transport, and the two sections were closed in 1954 and 1958 The central section from Sprucefield to Moira was destroyed by the construction of the M1 motorway in ...

Dukart's Canal

Dukart's Canal was built to provide transport for coal from the Drumglass Collieries to the Coalisland Canal in County Tyrone, Ulster, Ireland It opened in 1777, and used three inclined planes, rather than locks, to cope with changes in level There is little evidence that it was ever used, as the planes could not be made to work properly, and they were dismantled in 1787 Contents 1 History 11 Dukart's Design 2 Dukart's legacy 3 See also 4 Bibliography 41 References 5 External links Historyedit Coal seams were discovered at Drumglass, near Coalisland, in the 1690s, and the Tyrone ...

Broharris Canal

Coordinates: 55°03′07″N 7°00′00″W / 55052°N 7000°W / 55052; -7000 The Broharris Canal is a canal situated in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland Contents 1 History 2 See also 3 Bibliography 31 References 4 External links Historyedit The canal was constructed in the 1820s when a cut, some 32 km 2 mi long on the south shore of Lough Foyle near Ballykelly was made in the direction of Limavady As well as serving as a drainage channel, it was used for navigation, carrying goods brought from the Londonderry port and shellfish and kelp from the sand banks along the shore of t...

Witham Navigable Drains

The Witham Navigable Drains are located in Lincolnshire, England, and are part of a much larger drainage system managed by the Witham Fourth District Internal Drainage Board The Witham Fourth District comprises the East Fen and West Fen, to the north of Boston, which together cover an area of 97 square miles 250 km2 In total there are over 438 miles 705 km of drainage ditches, of which under 60 miles 97 km are navigable Navigation is normally only possible in the summer months, as the drains are maintained at a lower level in winter, and are subject to sudden changes in level as...