Thu . 20 Aug 2020
TR | RU | UK | KK | BE |

Hermes Pan

hermes pan, hermes pan biography
Hermes Pan December 10, 19091 – September 19, 1990 was an American dancer and choreographer, principally remembered as Fred Astaire's choreographic collaborator on the famous 1930s movie musicals starring Astaire and Ginger Rogers

Contents

  • 1 Early life
  • 2 Collaboration with Fred Astaire
  • 3 Film appearances
  • 4 Filmography as Choreographer
  • 5 Personal life
  • 6 Death
  • 7 Notes
  • 8 References
  • 9 External links

Early lifeedit

Pan was born Hermes Joseph Panagiotopoulos in 1909 in Memphis, Tennessee to Pantelis Panagiotopoulos, a Greek immigrant,2 and Mary Aljeanne Huston, a Southerner3 Pantelis, a confectioner by trade, was from a prominent family in Aigio in Peloponnese, where his family had opened the first theater4 In 1895, at the age of twenty-seven, Pantelis was chosen to represent Aigio at the Tennessee Centennial and International Exposition in Nashville as a "Greek Consul to the South"5 Initially intending to return to Greece, he ended up staying in Tennessee when he met Mary Huston in 19006 They married in 1901 and had their first son, Panos, in 19027 Pantelis became a United States citizen in 1903 and the Panagiotopoulos family moved to Memphis8 Their daughter, Vasso Maria, was born in 1906 Pantelis became president of the Eutrophia Company, which owned the Eutrophia Hotel and Cafe in Memphis and the family was well-off9 Pan was born at the family house in Memphis10 In 1911, two years after Pan's birth, the family returned to Nashville where Pantelis opened up his own restaurant11 In 1915, Pan's African-American nanny, "Aunt Betty," took him to her neighborhood, a African-American enclave of Nashville to introduce him to jazz music and tap dance, an experience that greatly affected him12 He befriended Aunt Betty's son, Sam Clark, who also worked for the family Sam, a talented dancer, taught Pan many of the era's popular dances13 Following the death of Pan's father in 1922, his uncle held Pan, his sister and mother at gunpoint and burned all their shares and money on the grounds that if he could not have them, no one would In 1923, Mary shortened the family name and took her family to New York City, accompanied by Sam Clark14 Initially, the had enough money to live comfortably on the Upper West Side, but soon their money ran out15 At their lowest ebb, the family had only some potatoes and coffee for their meal They vowed to commemorate that day and every year on June 13, they wrote down what they did and ate that day in a journal The date became a family celebration

Pan's career began with an appearance as a chorus boy in 1928 in the Marx Brothers Broadway production of Animal Crackers He also danced in partnership with his sister Vasso, who subsequently appeared in the chorus of many of the Astaire-Rogers pictures He first met Ginger Rogers in 1930, when he appeared as a chorus singer in the Broadway musical Top Speed

He retained links with his relatives in Greece and made an extensive visit in the 1970s to meet them

Collaboration with Fred Astaireedit

Astaire and Pan standing third from left in Second Chorus 1940

He met Fred Astaire, whom he physically resembled, on the set of Flying Down to Rio 1933, in which he worked as an assistant to dance director Dave Gould

While Astaire was trying to work out a series of steps for "The Carioca" number, it was suggested to him that Pan had a few ideas and Pan was invited over Hermes Pan demonstrated a brief break he had picked up from his street days in New York

From then on the two began a lifelong professional collaboration and friendship which included all the RKO Astaire pictures, including A Damsel in Distress 1937 in which Ginger Rogers did not appear, and for which he was awarded the 1937 Academy Award for Best Dance Direction He had previously received Academy Award nominations for the "Top Hat" and "The Piccolino" numbers from Top Hat 1935 and for the "Bojangles of Harlem"' number from Swing Time 1936

The Astaire-Pan collaboration, involving 17 out of Astaire's 31 musical films and three of his four television specials, is widely accepted as one of the most important forces in dance choreography of 20th century film and television musicals Astaire called Pan his "ideas man", and while he generally choreographed his own routines, and sometimes worked with other choreographers, he greatly valued the assistance of Pan not just as a source and critic of ideas, but also as a rehearsal partner for the purposes of fine-tuning a routine

Given Astaire's obsessive rehearsal habits, this was no mean task Pan also performed the essential function of rehearsing Ginger Rogers, whose many other commitments during the filming of the Astaire-Rogers musicals often conflicted with Astaire's rehearsal schedule In addition, he recorded Ginger's taps in post production in some numbers

Pan continued to collaborate with Astaire right up until the latter's last musical picture, Finian's Rainbow 1968, which was a disaster on a number of fronts, not least for Pan himself The young director Francis Ford Coppola had no prior experience with musical films, and proceeded to ride roughshod over Astaire and Pan's plans for the film's dance routines, reintroducing the style of dancing camera of the early 1930s which Astaire had done so much to banish from the Hollywood musical Eventually, Coppola fired Pan, who had a small walk-on part in the film; Coppola has since acknowledged his own primary responsibility for the film's artistic failure

Film appearancesedit

Hermes Pan and Rita Hayworth in the dance routine "On the Gay White Way" from My Gal Sal 1942

Pan's first on-screen appearance is as a clarinetist during the Astaire-Goddard routine "I Ain't Hep To That Step But I'll Dig It" in Second Chorus 1940, and dressed as The Ghost in the deleted and only Astaire-Pan routine "Me and the Ghost Upstairs" from the same film He appeared with Betty Grable in "Moon Over Miami" 1941 film and Coney Island 1943 His longest filmed dance routine is a complex tap duet with Grable in "Footlight Serenade" 1942 film that echoes his work with Astaire and Rogers in which his similarity to Astaire is striking He also appeared with Rita Hayworth in My Gal Sal 1942 and with Betty Grable again in Pin Up Girl 1944 In these films he had non-speaking dancing roles and acted as choreographer These are his only dance performances on film, except for a brief, but credited appearance in Kiss Me Kate as "Soldier Boy", performances which have also allowed comparisons between Pan's and Astaire's dance styles

When not working with Astaire, Pan was much in demand as a choreographer throughout the golden age of the Hollywood musical, most notably in Lovely to Look At 1952 and Kiss Me Kate 1953, in which Bob Fosse also choreographed and danced

He won an Emmy Award for the 1958 television special An Evening with Fred Astaire and was recognized with a National Film Award in 1980, and by the Joffrey Ballet in 1986

Filmography as Choreographeredit

  • Flying Down to Rio 1933 assistant
  • The Gay Divorcee 1934
  • Roberta 1935
  • Old Man Rhythm 1935
  • Top Hat 1935
  • In Person 1935
  • I Dream too Much 1935
  • Follow the Fleet 1936
  • Swing Time 1936
  • Shall We Dance 1937
  • Damsel in Distress 1937
  • Radio City Revels 1938
  • Second Chorus 1940 also actor
  • That Night in Rio 1941
  • Blood and Sand 1941 uncredited
  • Moon over Miami 1941 also dancer
  • My Gal Sal 1942 also dancer
  • Footlight Serenade 1942 also dancer
  • Song of the Islands 1942
  • Springtime in the Rockies 1942
  • Hello, Frisco, Hello 1943
  • Coney Island 1943 also actor
  • Sweet Rosie O'Grady 1943 also dancer
  • Pin Up Girl 1943 also dancer
  • Irish Eyes are Smiling 1944
  • Billy Rose's Diamond Horseshoe 1945
  • Blue Skies 1946
  • I Wonder Who's Kissing Her Now 1947
  • The Barkleys of Broadway 1949
  • Three Little Words 1950
  • Let's Dance 1950
  • Excuse my Dust 1950
  • Texas Carnival 1951
  • Lovely to Look At 1952
  • Sombrero 1953
  • Kiss me Kate 1953 also dancer
  • The Student Prince 1954
  • Jupiter's Darling 1954
  • Hit the Deck 1955
  • Meet Me in Las Vegas 1956
  • Silk Stockings 1957
  • Pal Joey 1957
  • Porgy and Bess 1959
  • The Blue Angel 1959
  • Can-Can 1960
  • Flower Drum Song 1961
  • Cleopatra 1963
  • My Fair Lady 1964
  • Finian's Rainbow 1968 also actor
  • Darling Lili 1970
  • Lost Horizon 1973
  • Help Me Dream 1981

Personal lifeedit

Pan never married He was a personal friend to the Shah of Iran, Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, who invited him to the country's 2,500 year celebration of Iran's monarchy at Persepolis He was also close to Diego Rivera who painted his full portrait Towards the end of his life he visited Greece, especially his father's city, and met his relatives

Pan was very close friends with Rita Hayworth and he served as a pallbearer at her funeral

According to John Franceschina in his book Hermes Pan: The Man Who Danced with Fred Astaire, it was well known in the movie industry that Pan was gay, but it never became public and the identity of his partners is not known16

Deathedit

Hermes Pan died on September 19, 1990, aged 80, from undisclosed causes He was survived by his sister Vasso, nieces Michelene Laski, Mary Ann Johnson and Christa Meade, and by his nephew Rock Meade17

Notesedit

  1. ^ Satchell, Tim 1987 Astaire – The biography London: Hutchinson p 109 ISBN 0-09-173736-2 
  2. ^ John Franceschina, Hermes Pan: The Man Who Danced with Fred Astaire, Oxford University Press, 2012, p 9
  3. ^ John Franceschina, Hermes Pan: The Man Who Danced with Fred Astaire, Oxford University Press, 2012, p 11
  4. ^ John Franceschina, Hermes Pan: The Man Who Danced with Fred Astaire, Oxford University Press, 2012, p 9
  5. ^ John Franceschina, Hermes Pan: The Man Who Danced with Fred Astaire, Oxford University Press, 2012, p 10
  6. ^ John Franceschina, Hermes Pan: The Man Who Danced with Fred Astaire, Oxford University Press, 2012, p 11
  7. ^ John Franceschina, Hermes Pan: The Man Who Danced with Fred Astaire, Oxford University Press, 2012, p 12
  8. ^ John Franceschina, Hermes Pan: The Man Who Danced with Fred Astaire, Oxford University Press, 2012, p 12
  9. ^ John Franceschina, Hermes Pan: The Man Who Danced with Fred Astaire, Oxford University Press, 2012, p 13
  10. ^ John Franceschina, Hermes Pan: The Man Who Danced with Fred Astaire, Oxford University Press, 2012, p 13
  11. ^ John Franceschina, Hermes Pan: The Man Who Danced with Fred Astaire, Oxford University Press, 2012, p 13
  12. ^ John Franceschina, Hermes Pan: The Man Who Danced with Fred Astaire, Oxford University Press, 2012, p 16
  13. ^ John Franceschina, Hermes Pan: The Man Who Danced with Fred Astaire, Oxford University Press, 2012, p 17-8
  14. ^ John Franceschina, Hermes Pan: The Man Who Danced with Fred Astaire, Oxford University Press, 2012, p 20
  15. ^ John Franceschina, Hermes Pan: The Man Who Danced with Fred Astaire, Oxford University Press, 2012, p 21
  16. ^ John Franceschina, Hermes Pan: The Man Who Danced with Fred Astaire, Oxford University Press, 2012, p 6
  17. ^ Flint, Peter B 1990-09-23 "Hermes Pan, Dancer, 79, Is Dead" New York Times Retrieved 2008-07-10 

Referencesedit

  • Fred Astaire: Steps in Time, Harper & Bros, 1959 Many Subsequent Reprints ISBN 978-0061567568
  • Garson Kanin: Together Again! The Stories of the Great Hollywood Teams, Doubleday, 1981 ISBN 978-0385174718
  • John Franceschina: Hermes Pan: The Man Who Danced with Fred Astaire, Oxford University Press 2012 ISBN 978-0199754298
  • John Mueller: Astaire Dancing – The Musical Films of Fred Astaire, Knopf 1985, ISBN 0-394-51654-0

External linksedit

  • Hermes Pan on Internet Movie Database
  • Hermes Pan at the Internet Broadway Database
  • Hermes Pan at Find a Grave
  • Dance portal

hermes pan, hermes pan biography, hermes pan dancer, hermes pan dancing youtube, hermes pandora, hermes pansage, hermes pantin, hermes pantograph, hermes pantone color, hermes pants


Hermes Pan Information about

Hermes Pan


  • user icon

    Hermes Pan beatiful post thanks!

    29.10.2014


Hermes Pan
Hermes Pan
Hermes Pan viewing the topic.
Hermes Pan what, Hermes Pan who, Hermes Pan explanation

There are excerpts from wikipedia on this article and video

Random Posts

Picts

Picts

The Picts were a tribal confederation of peoples who lived in what is today eastern and northern Sco...
Visual prosthesis

Visual prosthesis

A visual prosthesis, often referred to as a bionic eye, is an experimental visual device intended to...
Mini rugby

Mini rugby

Mini rugby, also known as New Image Rugby, is a form of rugby union designed to introduce the sport ...
List of synthetic polymers

List of synthetic polymers

Synthetic polymers are human-made polymers From the utility point of view they can be classified int...