Dummer, New Hampshire


Dummer is a town in Coos County, New Hampshire, United States The population was 304 at the 2010 census1 It is part of the Berlin, NH–VT micropolitan statistical area Dummer is home to the Pontook Reservoir, popular with canoeists, kayakers and birdwatchers In the western part of Dummer lies the village of Paris

Contents

  • 1 History
  • 2 Geography
  • 3 Demographics
  • 4 References
  • 5 External links

Historyedit

The town was granted on March 8, 1773 by Governor John Wentworth to a group of wealthy Portsmouth investors, including his father, Mark Hunking Wentworth, Nathaniel Haven and others2 He named it after Massachusetts Governor William Dummer,3 who successfully defended the eastern English provinces from the French and Indians in Dummer's War4 But the town remained unsettled until 1812 when William Leighton arrived from Farmington with his family Dummer was incorporated by the General Court on December 19, 18485

Pontook Reservoir in 1908

Mountainous terrain and sterility of the soil prevented cultivation But the region had forests, and the Upper Ammonoosuc River provided water power for mills There were two sawmills operating by 1859, with a considerable trade in timber2 Log drives on the Androscoggin River supplied the papermills downstream in Berlin Pontook Dam, which created Pontook Reservoir, was reconstructed in the mid-1980s to generate hydroelectric power

Geographyedit

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 495 square miles 128 km2, of which 482 square miles 125 km2 is land and 12 square miles 31 km2 is water, comprising 243% of the town6 The highest point in Dummer is the summit of Cow Mountain, at 2,289 feet 698 m above sea level Roughly the western third of Dummer lies within the Connecticut River watershed, where it is drained by the Upper Ammonoosuc River, with the eastern two-thirds in the Androscoggin River watershed7 The former community of Paris is in the western part of town, along Phillips Brook

Dummer is crossed by New Hampshire Route 16

Demographicsedit

Census
Historical population
Pop
1810 7
1820 27 2857%
1830 65 1407%
1840 57 −123%
1850 171 2000%
1860 289 690%
1870 317 97%
1880 464 464%
1890 455 −19%
1900 349 −233%
1910 292 −163%
1920 266 −89%
1930 298 120%
1940 274 −81%
1950 229 −164%
1960 202 −118%
1970 225 114%
1980 390 733%
1990 327 −162%
2000 309 −55%
2010 304 −16%
Est 2015 288 −53%
US Decennial Census9

As of the census10 of 2000, there were 309 people, 128 households, and 102 families residing in the town The population density was 65 people per square mile 25/km² There were 252 housing units at an average density of 53 per square mile 20/km² The racial makeup of the town was 9871% White, 032% Asian, and 097% from two or more races

There were 128 households out of which 305% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 648% were married couples living together, 109% had a female householder with no husband present, and 203% were non-families 195% of all households were made up of individuals and 55% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older The average household size was 240 and the average family size was 273

In the town, the population was spread out with 243% under the age of 18, 39% from 18 to 24, 285% from 25 to 44, 304% from 45 to 64, and 129% who were 65 years of age or older The median age was 42 years For every 100 females there were 1033 males For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 1000 males

The median income for a household in the town was $32,750, and the median income for a family was $42,708 Males had a median income of $29,286 versus $22,083 for females The per capita income for the town was $16,754 About 46% of families and 67% of the population were below the poverty line, including 24% of those under the age of eighteen and 100% of those sixty five or over

Referencesedit

  1. ^ United States Census Bureau, American FactFinder, 2010 Census figures Retrieved March 23, 2011
  2. ^ a b Austin J Coolidge & John B Mansfield, A History and Description of New England; Boston, Massachusetts 1859
  3. ^ Gannett, Henry 1905 The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States Govt Print Off p 110 
  4. ^ New Hampshire Economic and Labor Market Information Bureau Profile
  5. ^ http://wwwnhsearchrootscom/documents/coos-history/History_Dummer_NHtxt
  6. ^ "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data G001 - Dummer town, New Hampshire" US Census Bureau American Factfinder Archived from the original on September 11, 2013 Retrieved November 8, 2011 
  7. ^ Foster, Debra H; Batorfalvy, Tatianna N; Medalie, Laura 1995 Water Use in New Hampshire: An Activities Guide for Teachers US Department of the Interior and US Geological Survey 
  8. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015" Retrieved July 2, 2016 
  9. ^ "Census of Population and Housing" Censusgov Archived from the original on May 11, 2015 Retrieved June 4, 2016 
  10. ^ "American FactFinder" United States Census Bureau Archived from the original on 2013-09-11 Retrieved 2008-01-31 

External linksedit

  • Town of Dummer official website
  • New Hampshire Economic and Labor Market Information Bureau Profile
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