Coös County, New Hampshire


Coös County /ˈkoʊɒs/, with two syllables, frequently spelled Coos County,12 is a county in the state of New Hampshire, in the United States As of the 2010 census, the population was 33,055,3 the least of any New Hampshire county The county seat is Lancaster4

The two-syllable pronunciation is sometimes indicated with a dieresis, notably in the Lancaster-based weekly newspaper The Coös County Democrat and on some county-owned vehicles The county government uses both spellings interchangeably

Coös County is part of the Berlin, NH–VT Micropolitan Statistical Area It is the only New Hampshire county on the Canada–United States border, south of the province of Quebec, and thus is home to New Hampshire's only international port of entry, the Pittsburg-Chartierville Border Crossing

Coös County includes the whole of the state's northern panhandle Major industries include forestry and tourism, with the once-dominant paper-making industry in sharp decline The county straddles two of the state's tourism regions The southernmost portion of the county is part of the White Mountains Region and is home to Mount Washington The remainder of the county is known as the Great North Woods Region

Contents

  • 1 History
  • 2 Geography
    • 21 Mountains
    • 22 Adjacent counties
    • 23 National protected areas
  • 3 Demographics
    • 31 2000 census
    • 32 2010 census
  • 4 Politics
  • 5 Media
    • 51 Radio
    • 52 Television
    • 53 Newspapers
  • 6 Communities
    • 61 City
    • 62 Towns
    • 63 Townships
    • 64 Census-designated places
    • 65 Villages
  • 7 In popular culture
  • 8 See also
  • 9 References
  • 10 External links

Historyedit

Coös County was separated from the northern part of Grafton County, New Hampshire and organized at Berlincitation needed December 24, 1803, although the county seat was later moved to Lancaster, with an additional shire town at Colebrook The name Coös derives from the Algonquian word meaning "small pines"5

During the American Revolutionary War two units of troops of the Continental Army — Bedel's Regiment and Whitcomb's Rangers — were raised from the settlers of Coös From the Treaty of Paris of 1783 until 1835 the boundaries in the northern tip of the county and New Hampshire itself were disputed with Lower Canada which was soon to become part of the Province of Canada, and for some years residents of the area formed the independent Republic of Indian Stream

In the 1810 census there were 3,991 residents, and by 1870 there were nearly 15,000, at which point the entire county was valued at just under $USD 5 million, with farm productivity per acre comparing favorably with that of contemporary Illinois Other early industries included forestry and manufacturing, using 4,450 water horsepower in 1870

Geographyedit

According to the US Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,830 square miles 4,700 km2, of which 1,795 square miles 4,650 km2 is land and 35 square miles 91 km2 19% is water6 It is the largest county in New Hampshire by area, and it is one of only two counties in the United States to share land borders with two different states and another country, along with Boundary County, Idaho

Much of its mountainous area is reserved as national forest, wilderness, state parks and other public areas; these encompass most of the northern portion of the White Mountains, including all the named summits of the Presidential Range though one, Mt Webster's, lies about 200 feet 61 m from the county line Mt Washington's peak is the highest in the Northeast The 162-mile 261 km Cohos Trail runs the length of the county7

The principal state highways in Coös County are New Hampshire Route 16, which runs mostly parallel to the Maine state line, and New Hampshire Route 26, which traverses the Great Northern Woods from Vermont Route 102 southeast to Maine Route 26 towards Portland The two major US Highways are US Route 2, which roughly bisects the county from Lancaster to the Oxford County line, and US Route 3, which runs from Carroll in the south to the Canada–US border at Pittsburg/Chartierville, where it continues as Quebec Route 257

Mountainsedit

  • White Mountains in the White Mountain National Forest
  • Presidential Range

Adjacent countiesedit

  • Oxford County, Maine east
  • Carroll County southeast
  • Grafton County southwest
  • Essex County, Vermont west
  • Coaticook Regional County Municipality, Quebec, Canada north
  • Le Haut-Saint-François Regional County Municipality, Quebec, Canada north
  • Le Granit Regional County Municipality, Quebec, Canada north

National protected areasedit

  • Umbagog National Wildlife Refuge part
  • Silvio O Conte National Fish and Wildlife Refuge part
  • White Mountain National Forest part

Demographicsedit

Census
Historical population
Pop
1810 3,991
1820 5,549 390%
1830 8,388 512%
1840 9,849 174%
1850 11,853 203%
1860 13,161 110%
1870 14,932 135%
1880 18,580 244%
1890 23,211 249%
1900 29,468 270%
1910 30,753 44%
1920 36,093 174%
1930 38,959 79%
1940 39,274 08%
1950 35,932 −85%
1960 37,140 34%
1970 34,291 −77%
1980 35,147 25%
1990 34,828 −09%
2000 33,111 −49%
2010 33,055 −02%
Est 2016 32,039 −31%
US Decennial Census9
1790-196010 1900-199011
1990-200012

2000 censusedit

As of the census13 of 2000, there were 33,111 people, 13,961 households, and 9,158 families residing in the county The population density was 18 people per square mile 7/km² There were 19,623 housing units at an average density of 11 per square mile 4/km² The racial makeup of the county was 9805% White, 012% Black or African American, 028% Native American, 037% Asian, 002% Pacific Islander, 016% from other races, and 100% from two or more races 061% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race 235% were of French, 198% French Canadian, 142% English, 102% Irish and 100% American ancestry 1617% of the population speak French at home 1

There were 13,961 households out of which 2810% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 5230% were married couples living together, 880% had a female householder with no husband present, and 3440% were non-families 2880% of all households were made up of individuals and 1410% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older The average household size was 233 and the average family size was 282

In the county, the population was spread out with 2280% under the age of 18, 630% from 18 to 24, 2670% from 25 to 44, 2570% from 45 to 64, and 1850% who were 65 years of age or older The median age was 42 years For every 100 females there were 9560 males For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 9260 males

The median income for a household in the county was $33,593, and the median income for a family was $40,654 Males had a median income of $32,152 versus $21,088 for females The per capita income for the county was $17,218 About 680% of families and 1000% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1070% of those under age 18 and 1250% of those age 65 or over

2010 censusedit

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 33,055 people, 14,171 households, and 8,879 families residing in the county14 The population density was 184 inhabitants per square mile 71/km2 There were 21,321 housing units at an average density of 119 per square mile 46/km215 The racial makeup of the county was 969% white, 05% Asian, 04% American Indian, 04% black or African American, 03% from other races, and 14% from two or more races Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 12% of the population14

Of the 14,171 households, 253% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 485% were married couples living together, 92% had a female householder with no husband present, 373% were non-families, and 303% of all households were made up of individuals The average household size was 223 and the average family size was 272 The median age was 464 years14

189% of the population were under the age of 18, 67% were from age 18 to 24, 221% were from 25 to 44, 329% were from 45 to 64, and 194% were age 65 or older The median age was 464 years For every 100 females there were 1034 males, and for every 100 females age 18 and older, there were 1018 males14

During the period 2011-2015, the largest self-reported ancestry groups in the county were 393% French or French Canadian, 169% Irish, 142% English, 72% "American", 55% Italian, 49% German, and 36% Scottish16

During 2011-2015, the estimated median annual income for a household in the county was $42,312, and the median income for a family was $55,385 Male full-time workers had a median income of $41,934 versus $34,859 for females The per capita income for the county was $24,546 About 99% of families and 141% of the population were below the poverty line, including 217% of those under age 18 and 82% of those age 65 or over17

Politicsedit

Coös County is one of the most consistent bellwether counties in the United States, having supported the president-elect in every election since 1892 except for 1968 and 2004, when it supported losing Democrat candidates Humphrey and Kerry1819

Presidential Elections Results20
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 509% 7,952 420% 6,563 71% 1,112
2012 404% 6,342 579% 9,095 17% 262
2008 401% 6,558 583% 9,532 16% 258
2004 481% 8,143 507% 8,585 12% 197
2000 502% 7,329 450% 6,570 48% 701
1996 333% 4,703 509% 7,191 159% 2,243
1992 334% 5,271 415% 6,559 251% 3,974
1988 633% 8,763 360% 4,981 07% 96
1984 712% 10,013 285% 4,004 03% 40
1980 601% 8,724 327% 4,749 72% 1,047
1976 485% 7,094 505% 7,385 11% 159
1972 608% 9,468 375% 5,829 17% 266
1968 440% 6,822 533% 8,261 27% 414
1964 289% 4,863 711% 11,956
1960 427% 7,797 573% 10,455
1956 661% 11,465 339% 5,871 00% 2
1952 560% 9,975 440% 7,848
1948 462% 7,005 523% 7,930 15% 230
1944 416% 6,209 584% 8,709 00% 4
1940 397% 6,650 603% 10,100
1936 429% 6,737 557% 8,737 14% 220
1932 473% 7,189 521% 7,928 06% 88
1928 566% 7,891 431% 6,006 02% 34
1924 527% 6,137 397% 4,620 77% 894
1920 545% 6,114 444% 4,985 12% 129
1916 442% 2,762 520% 3,247 38% 237
1912 352% 1,938 405% 2,229 243% 1,334
1908 583% 3,294 393% 2,216 24% 136
1904 591% 3,343 396% 2,241 13% 75
1900 574% 3,383 413% 2,436 13% 75
1896 660% 3,253 302% 1,489 38% 186
1892 474% 2,419 517% 2,639 10% 50
1888 453% 2,297 538% 2,729 10% 48
1884 444% 1,987 536% 2,394 20% 90
1880 429% 1,829 560% 2,387 11% 48
1876 437% 1,679 555% 2,130 08% 31

Mediaedit

Radioedit

See also: Template:Northeast Kingdom and Northern New Hampshire Radio
  • WMOU - 1230 AM, Berlin - Nostalgia
  • WOTX - 937 FM, Groveton - Classic rock - "The Outlaw"
  • WHOM - 949 FM, Mount Washington - Soft Adult Contemporary - "America's Superstation" serves Portland, Maine; broadcasts from Mount Washington
  • W238BP - 953 FM, Berlin - Hot Adult Contemporary - "Magic 104" - Rebroadcast of WVMJ, North Conway
  • W251BD - 981 FM, Berlin - Hot Adult Contemporary - "Magic 104" - Rebroadcast of WVMJ, North Conway
  • WNYN-FM - 991 FM, Jefferson - Adult Hits - "Free 991"
  • WXXS - 1023 FM, Lancaster -Top 40- "Kiss 1023"
  • WPKQ - 1037 FM, North Conway - broadcasts from Mount Washington
  • WEVC - 1071 FM, Gorham - New Hampshire Public Radio

Compiled from Radiostationworldcom

Some stations from nearby Sherbrooke can also be received in Coös County, the strongest being CITE-FM-1 1027 FM For details of stations, see Template:Sherbrooke Radio

Televisionedit

See also: Template:Portland Maine TV
  • W34DQ-D - Pittsburg - Channel 34, rebroadcast of New Hampshire Public Television NHPTV
  • W27BL - Berlin - Channel 27, rebroadcast of WMUR-TV ABC

Coös County is part of the Portland-Auburn DMA Cable companies carry local market stations WPFO Fox, WMTW ABC, WGME CBS, and WCSH NBC, plus NHPTV, WMUR and select stations from the Burlington / Plattsburgh market Sherbrooke stations CKSH-DT Ici Radio-Canada Télé and CHLT-DT TVA, as well as Montreal station CBMT-DT CBC are also available, though reception and/or cable carriage may vary by location

Newspapersedit

  • The Colebrook Chronicle - Weekly published Fridays from Colebrook, circulation 6,000 Also produces weekly Video New of the Week embedded at website
  • The Coös County Democrat - Weekly published Wednesdays from Lancaster
  • The News and Sentinel - Weekly in Colebrook
  • The Berlin Daily Sun
  • The Berlin Reporter - Weekly published Wednesdays from Berlin
  • Great Northwoods Journal - Weekly from Lancaster, publication ceased January 2013
  • The North Woods Weekly - Weekly from Lancaster, published by The News and Sentinel

Communitiesedit

Modern town borders in Coös County, New Hampshire Cities and towns are named in black and have town records Green places are unincorporated, and do not keep records

Cityedit

  • Berlin

Townsedit

  • Carroll
  • Clarksville
  • Colebrook
  • Columbia
  • Dalton
  • Dummer
  • Errol
  • Gorham
  • Jefferson
  • Lancaster county seat
  • Milan
  • Northumberland
  • Pittsburg
  • Randolph
  • Shelburne
  • Stark
  • Stewartstown
  • Stratford
  • Whitefield

Townshipsedit

  • Atkinson and Gilmanton Academy Grant
  • Bean's Grant
  • Bean's Purchase
  • Cambridge
  • Chandler's Purchase
  • Crawford's Purchase
  • Cutt's Grant
  • Dix's Grant
  • Dixville
  • Erving's Location
  • Green's Grant
  • Hadley's Purchase
  • Kilkenny
  • Low and Burbank's Grant
  • Martin's Location
  • Millsfield
  • Odell
  • Pinkham's Grant
  • Sargent's Purchase
  • Second College Grant
  • Success
  • Thompson and Meserve's Purchase
  • Wentworth's Location

Census-designated placesedit

  • Colebrook
  • Gorham
  • Groveton
  • Lancaster
  • West Stewartstown
  • Whitefield

Villagesedit

  • Bretton Woods
  • Cascade
  • Dixville Notch
  • North Stratford
  • Twin Mountain

In popular cultureedit

Robert Frost, who once lived in Franconia in neighboring Grafton County, wrote the poem "The Witch of Coös"21

Coös County is the setting for the John Irving novel Last Night in Twisted River, Twisted River being a logging settlement in the county22

See alsoedit

  • National Register of Historic Places listings in Coös County, New Hampshire

Referencesedit

  1. ^ US Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Coos County
  2. ^ "New Hampshire Revised Statutes Annotated 22:11, "Coos"" New Hampshire General Court Retrieved May 24, 2010 
  3. ^ "State & County QuickFacts" United States Census Bureau Retrieved September 24, 2013 
  4. ^ "Find a County" National Association of Counties Archived from the original on May 31, 2011 Retrieved 2011-06-07 
  5. ^ Bright, William Native American Placenames of the United States 2004 Norman, Oklahoma: University of Oklahoma Press
  6. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files" United States Census Bureau August 22, 2012 Archived from the original on December 27, 2014 Retrieved December 27, 2014 
  7. ^ "Hiker completes creation of 162-mile trail", Billy Baker, Boston Globe, October 16, 2011
  8. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" Retrieved June 9, 2017 
  9. ^ "US Decennial Census" United States Census Bureau Archived from the original on May 12, 2015 Retrieved December 27, 2014 
  10. ^ "Historical Census Browser" University of Virginia Library Retrieved December 27, 2014 
  11. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990" United States Census Bureau Retrieved December 27, 2014 
  12. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4 Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" PDF United States Census Bureau Retrieved December 27, 2014 
  13. ^ "American FactFinder" United States Census Bureau Archived from the original on September 11, 2013 Retrieved 2008-01-31 
  14. ^ a b c d "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data" United States Census Bureau Retrieved 2016-01-12 
  15. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County" United States Census Bureau Retrieved 2016-01-12 
  16. ^ "People Reporting Ancestry; Universe: Total population; 2011-2015 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates B04006, Coos County, New Hampshire" American Factfinder US Census Bureau Retrieved May 17, 2017 
  17. ^ "Selected Economic Characteristics; 2011-2015 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates DP03: Coos County, New Hampshire" American Factfinder US Census Bureau Retrieved May 17, 2017 
  18. ^ 'There Are No Bellwether Counties'
  19. ^ 1892 'Presidential Election of 1892' and subsequent elections' maps
  20. ^ http://uselectionatlasorg/RESULTS
  21. ^ Meyers, Jeffrey "On "The Witch of Coös"" Modern American Poetry University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign Department of English Retrieved October 24, 2016 
  22. ^ "Last Night in Twisted River" johnirvingcom Retrieved October 24, 2016 

Coordinates: 44°41′N 71°18′W / 4469°N 7130°W / 4469; -7130

External linksedit

  • Official website
  • University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension: Coös County office
  • National Register of Historic Places listing for Coos County
‹ The template below Geographic location is being considered for deletion See templates for discussion to help reach a consensus ›

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Coös County, New Hampshire

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