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Boyd Group

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Animal testing
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Issues
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Cases
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Companies
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Groups/campaigns
AALAS · AAAS · ALF
Americans for Medical Progress
Boyd Group · BUAV
Dr Hadwen Trust
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Research · FRAME
National Anti-Vivisection Society
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PETA · Physicians Committee
for Responsible Medicine
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Pro-Test
SPEAK · SHAC
Speaking of Research
Understanding Animal Research

Writers/activists
Tipu Aziz · Michael Balls
Neal Barnard · Colin Blakemore
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Ingrid Newkirk · Bernard Rollin
Jerry Vlasak · Syed Ziaur Rahman

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Animal testing · Animal rights
Animal welfare

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The Boyd Group is a Britain-based, independent think tank considering issues relating to animal testing

Contents

  • 1 Background
  • 2 Objectives and approach
  • 3 Membership
  • 4 Publications
  • 5 See also
  • 6 References
  • 7 External links

Backgroundedit

The group was founded in 1992, the idea forming from a dialogue between Colin Blakemore, a strong advocate of animal testing and subsequently chief executive of the Medical Research Council, and Les Ward, then director of the anti-vivisection group, Advocates for Animals The group is named after its chairman, Kenneth Boyd, a professor of medical ethics at the University of Edinburgh1

Objectives and approachedit

The groups states its primary objective is to act as a "forum for open exchange of views" on "issues of concern" to its membership and, whenever possible, form consensus and make recommendations2 However, due to the diverse membership, the group will often fail to find consensus In these situations, they aim to publish "an agreed account of where members as people familiar with the issues differ from one another, regarding what they consider to be the relevant facts, the best interpretation of these facts and relevant moral arguments"2 Issues for debate are raised by members, then discussed by the group or a sub-group Occasionally, the group may communicate with other bodies, such as Pro-Test3

Patrick Bateson has said of the group:

I was involved with the Boyd Group when Kenneth Boyd was doing his early report with Jane Smith for the Institute of Medical Ethics We were a disparate group of people ranging from some gung-ho scientists on the one hand to some hard-line animal rights people on the other hand We worked together for three years and eventually we were all talking to each other It can be done Even the groups which seem so implacably opposed can end up understanding that there might be agreed positions, because the moral issues are numerous and we have to try to bring these very different forms of morality together4

The Boyd Group has been criticized by some anti-vivisection organisations Representatives of the National Anti-Vivisection Society NAVS told a House of Lords select committee the Boyd Group is a "talking shop" with a "pre-set agenda" 5 However, Les Ward defended Advocates for Animals' membership of the group and the effectiveness of a collaborative approach:

Before cosmetic testing was abolished by the government, or a ban introduced, the Boyd Group called for it to be banned That was great, here was the animal welfare and the scientific community going together to the Home Office with a powerful voice and putting the case forward" 6

Membershipedit

The group had, according to Blakemore in 2002, "about 25 member organisations" 7 including animal welfare groups, anti-vivisectionist groups, charitable bodies, government, industry, veterinarians, academic scientists and philosophers The membership includes both expert individuals and those nominated by, and representative of, groups or societies The group invites applications for membership, but excluding only individuals and groups that "support violent activity or break the criminal law"2 Identified members, past and present, include:

  • Professor Colin Blakemore
  • Professor Kenneth Boyd
  • Bioscience Federation's Animal Science Group 8
  • Professor Stephen R L Clark 9
  • Dr Robert Hubrecht 9
  • Advocates for Animals 10
  • RSPCA 10
  • Fund for the Replacement of Animals in Medical Experiments 10
  • The Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry 11
  • Professor Patrick Bateson

The Boyd Group lacks representation from a number of large anti-vivisectionist organisations, with Blakemore admitting their "credibility is reduced because of that"7 Both Ward and Blakemore have expressed a wish to include more of these organisations, including BUAV, NAVS, PETA and Animal Aid610

Ward has since withdrawn from the Boyd Group, believing it had become "stalemated", but in 2006 continued to defend his participation in "one of the few places where moderate activists and moderate scientists sat down and talked things over" 12

Publicationsedit

  • Ethical review of research involving animals: a role for institutional ethics committees March 1995 13
  • Advancing refinement of laboratory animal use April 1998 14
  • The use of animals for testing cosmetics July 1998 15
  • Genetic engineering: animal welfare and ethics September 1999 16
  • The use of non-human primates in research and testing June 2002 17
  • The use of animals in testing household products December 2002 18
  • Boyd Group/RSPCA: Categorising the severity of scientific procedures on animals July 2004 19

See alsoedit

  • Animal Procedures Committee
  • Animals Scientific Procedures Act 1986
  • Animal Liberation Front
  • Animal liberation movement
  • Animal testing
  • Animal rights

Referencesedit

  1. ^ Kenneth Boyd Bringing both sides together Camb Q Healthc Ethics 1999; 8:43-5 PMID 9924617
  2. ^ a b c "About the Boyd Group" PDF Archived from the original PDF on July 14, 2007   187 KiB Retrieved December 12, 2006
  3. ^ Pro-Test at the Boyd Group Retrieved December 12, 2006
  4. ^ Patrick Bateson's evidence Archived June 5, 2011, at the Wayback Machine to the House of Lords Select Committee on Animal Testing, 2002
  5. ^ Minutes of Evidence, Question 1362 Select Committee on Animals In Scientific Procedures, March 12, 2002 Retrieved December 12, 2006
  6. ^ a b Minutes of Evidence, Question 1384 Select Committee on Animals In Scientific Procedures, March 12, 2002 Retrieved December 12, 2006
  7. ^ a b Minutes of Evidence, Question 964 Select Committee on Animals In Scientific Procedures, January 22, 2002 Retrieved December 12, 2006
  8. ^ Report of the Animal Science Group of the Biosciences Federation for 2005 Archived May 26, 2006, at the Wayback Machine Biosciences Federation Retrieved December 12, 2006
  9. ^ a b Current APC Members and Register of Interests Archived February 8, 2007, at the Wayback Machine The Animal Procedures Committee Retrieved December 12, 2006
  10. ^ a b c d Minutes of Evidence, Question 967 Select Committee on Animals In Scientific Procedures, January 22, 2002 Retrieved December 12, 2006
  11. ^ Minutes of Evidence, Question 1004 Select Committee on Animals In Scientific Procedures, January 22, 2002 Retrieved December 12, 2006
  12. ^ Emma Marris Animal research: Grey Matters Nature, 13 December 2006 Retrieved December 23, 2006
  13. ^ A role for Institutional Ethics Committees Archived December 6, 2006, at the Wayback Machine The Boyd Group, 1995 Retrieved December 12, 2006
  14. ^ "Advancing refinement of laboratory animal use" PDF  168 KiB Laboratory Animals 1998; 32:137-42 Retrieved December 12, 2006
  15. ^ The use of animals for testing cosmetics Archived October 27, 2006, at the Wayback Machine The Boyd Group, 1998 Retrieved December 12, 2006
  16. ^ Genetic engineering: animal welfare and ethics Archived February 8, 2007, at the Wayback Machine The Boyd Group, 1999 Retrieved December 12, 2006
  17. ^ "The use of non-human primates in research and testing" PDF Archived from the original PDF on July 14, 2007   119 KiB The Boyd Group, 2002 Retrieved December 12, 2006
  18. ^ "The use of animals in testing household products" PDF Archived from the original PDF on August 14, 2006   390 KiB The Boyd Group, 2002 Retrieved December 12, 2006
  19. ^ "Categorising the severity of scientific procedures on animals" PDF Archived from the original PDF on July 14, 2007   377 KiB The Boyd Group/RSPCA, 2004 Retrieved December 12, 2006

External linksedit

  • The Boyd Group homepage

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