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National Waterways Museum

The National Waterways Museum NWM is in Ellesmere Port, Cheshire, England, at the northern end of the Shropshire Union Canal where it meets the Manchester Ship Canal grid reference SJ406771 The museum's collections and archives focus on the Britain's navigable inland waterways, including its rivers and canals, and include canal boats, traditional clothing, painted canal decorative ware and tools It is one of several museums and attractions operated by the Canal & River Trust, the successor to The Waterways Trust Contents 1 History 2 Collections 21 Museum 3 See also 4 References 5 E...

Scottish Canals

Scottish Canals is the public corporation of the Scottish Government responsible for managing the country's inland waterways Formerly a division of British Waterways, it became a stand-alone public body of the Scottish Government on 2 July 20121 Legally, the corporation is still referred to as the British Waterways Board, but in all other aspects it uses the brand Scottish Canals and intends to steadily roll out this brand over the network2 Based in Glasgow, Scottish Canals runs the Caledonian, Crinan, Forth and Clyde, Monkland and Union Canals It cares for 137 miles 220 km of waterway ne...

Winding hole

A winding hole /ˈwɪndɪŋ/ is a widened area of a canal usually in the United Kingdom, used for turning a canal boat such as a narrowboat Contents 1 Etymology 2 History 3 Use 4 See also 5 References Etymologyedit Look up winding in Wiktionary, the free dictionary The word is commonly believed to derive from the practice of using the wind to assist with the turn1 Another Etymology, however, is the Old English word for turn - "Windan", pronounced with a short I as in windlass, a handle for winding long I gears2 Old English was in use up to and including the 18th century when the canal...

Crinan Canal

The Crinan Canal between Crinan and Ardrishaig in Argyll and Bute in the west of Scotland is operated by Scottish Canals The canal, which opened in 1801, takes its name from the village of Crinan at its western end Approximately nine miles 14 km long, the canal connects the village of Ardrishaig on Loch Gilp with the Sound of Jura, providing a navigable route between the Clyde and the Inner Hebrides, without the need for a long diversion around the Kintyre peninsula, and in particular the exposed Mull of Kintyre1 Contents 1 History 2 Features 3 Popular culture 4 See also 5 References...

Caledonian Canal

The Caledonian Canal connects the Scottish east coast at Inverness with the west coast at Corpach near Fort William in Scotland The canal was constructed in the early nineteenth century by Scottish engineer Thomas Telford, and is a sister canal of the Göta Canal in Sweden, also constructed by Telford Contents 1 Route 2 History 3 Operation 4 Names 5 Points of interest 6 References 61 Bibliography 7 External links Routeedit The canal runs some 60 miles 97 km from northeast to southwest Only one third of the entire length is man-made, the rest being formed by Loch Dochfour, Loch N...

Ulster Canal

The Ulster Canal is a disused canal running through part of County Armagh, County Tyrone and County Fermanagh in Northern Ireland and County Monaghan in the Republic of Ireland In the early 19th century the idea of linking the lowlands around Lough Neagh with the Erne Basin and the River Shannon system became popular with the more progressive landowners and merchants of Armagh, Monaghan and Fermanagh The Ulster Canal was built between 1825 and 1842 and was 74 km 46 mi long with 26 locks It ran from Charlemont on the River Blackwater to Wattle Bridge on the River Finn, south-east of U...

Strabane Canal

The Strabane Canal is a short four mile canal in County Tyrone, Northern Ireland It connected the market town of Strabane to the navigable River Foyle and thence to the port of Londonderry on the north coast of Ireland The canal opened in 1796 and closed in 1962 Contents 1 History 11 Operation 12 Decline 2 Restoration 3 Current status 4 See also 5 Bibliography 51 References Historyedit The Strabane Canal was conceived by the Marquess of Abercorn as a way of encouraging industrial and commercial development in Strabane and its immediate surroundings, most of which was within his e...

Shannon–Erne Waterway

The Shannon–Erne Waterway Irish: Uiscebhealach na Sionainne is na hÉirne; Ulster-Scots: Shannon–Erne Wattèrgate is a canal linking the River Shannon in the Republic of Ireland with the River Erne in Northern Ireland Managed by Waterways Ireland, the canal is 63 km 39 mi in length, has sixteen locks and runs from Leitrim village in County Leitrim to Upper Lough Erne in County Fermanagh The official opening of the Shannon–Erne Waterway took place at Corraguil Lock, Teemore, County Fermanagh on 23 May 1994 Contents 1 History 2 Decline 3 A new waterway 4 Course of the waterway 5 Map...

Newry Canal

The Newry Canal, located in Northern Ireland, was built to link the Tyrone coalfields via Lough Neagh and the River Bann to the Irish Sea at Carlingford Lough near Newry It was the first summit level canal to be built in Ireland or Great Britain, 1 and pre-dated the more famous Bridgewater Canal by nearly thirty years and Sankey Brook by fifteen years It was authorised by the Commissioners of Inland Navigation for Ireland, and was publicly funded It was opened in 1742, but there were issues with the lock construction, the width of the summit level and the water supply Below Newry, a ship canal...

Lagan Canal

The Lagan Canal was a 27-mile 43 km canal built to connect Belfast to Lough Neagh The first section, which is a river navigation, was opened in 1763, and linked Belfast to Lisburn The second section from Lisburn to Lough Neagh includes a small amount of river navigation, but was largely built as a canal At its peak it was one of the most successful of the Irish canals,1 but ultimately it was unable to compete with road and rail transport, and the two sections were closed in 1954 and 1958 The central section from Sprucefield to Moira was destroyed by the construction of the M1 motorway in ...

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